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The ionization energy of an atom or molecule describes the minimum amount of energy required to remove an electron from the atom or molecule in the gaseous state. Do not confuse with [electron-affinity].

9
votes
In fact, it is not restricted at all. You may compare the energies needed to remove one electron out of a solid; these are also meaningful, albeit in a different way, and known for a wide range of sub …
answered Sep 4 '15 by Ivan Neretin
2
votes
Ionization energy of some arbitrary atom is not related whatsoever to its transition energy. Also, there are many different transitions (even in a hydrogen atom), each with its own specific energy. It …
answered Jun 25 '16 by Ivan Neretin
2
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When you ionize or break something, the resulting particles (an electron and an ion, or maybe two atoms, or whatever) would fly away from each other with arbitrary speed. Their kinetic energy would ab …
answered Apr 16 '16 by Ivan Neretin