Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 16724

This tag should be applied to questions relating to the theory, design, techniques or performance of chemical experiments. This includes but is not limited to theoretical structures, expected products, thermal calculations, and empirical analysis. Additional tags should be applied to narrow down the field of research.

0
votes
An old school method is to make up known concentrations of the reference material and standardise the spotting method. The spot size was then used to approximate a concentration and give a purity rang …
answered Jun 27 '16 by Beerhunter
6
votes
Different types of solder can give a very high operating temperature, are cheap and offer excellent conduction and heat contact when molten. We have used lead and cadmium free solder to 500 degrees C …
answered Feb 13 '16 by Beerhunter
1
vote
Is there a goal here? If you wanted to react aluminium with concentrated aq ammonia, you would get hydrogen but the rate would be proportional to temperature. However, this would be quite a poor way …
answered Jun 13 '15 by Beerhunter
1
vote
Picric acid (2,4,6-trinitrophenol) is an aromatic compound has been used as an etchant in the past. Picral is an ethanol solution of picric acid and could etch steel. Look up www.metallographic.com/et …
answered Aug 1 '15 by Beerhunter
2
votes
Obviously temperature affects decomposition rates, but maintaining generation and stability of the nitrous acid is key to actually achieving aryl diazonium salt production. Different counterions impar …
answered Jun 19 '17 by Beerhunter
1
vote
The time taken (before there are diminishing returns) of extracting the herb is totally dependent on the solvent used, or in your case, the oil. If you were to use water, the answer might be days. If …
answered Aug 6 '17 by Beerhunter
0
votes
For solvent mixtures, especially in mixture or solubility design of experiments, I work in mass for the solvents. It's unaffected by temperature, more accurate (very advantageous if small values ar …
answered Feb 26 '17 by Beerhunter
3
votes
If you can, use a digital vacuum guage. I never use a bubbler as it can draw air in and introduce oxygen into your material as a result. Not ideal. You could try and use nitrogen through the capillar …
answered Jul 16 '15 by Beerhunter
3
votes
You could theoretically boil at the higher temperature but why would that be a requirement? Why would you require reflux specifically if you can actually heat the formic acid to higher temperatures un …
answered May 2 by Beerhunter
1
vote
It's tempting to use phase separation with an aqueous phase, but you're clearly having issues. One option is to evaporate the volatile solvents off, add toluene, cyclohexane or heptane and try water …
answered Jun 5 by Beerhunter
2
votes
I believe the term you are looking for is trituration. The word itself has other meanings, but this method of inducing crystallisation is one.
answered Apr 5 '16 by Beerhunter
3
votes
To meet your brief of a) performing a hydrogenation and b) using Raney nickel, but performed in the safest manner, I would use aluminium-nickel alloy. This is cheaper than sponge/Raney nickel and eas …
answered Jan 8 by Beerhunter