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The study of chemical systems using the laws and concepts of physics. This usually requires the techniques of thermodynamics, statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics.

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I don't think it necessarily suggests a phase change. It just seems to me that, at the higher pressures, we are seeing non-ideal gas behavior setting in.
answered May 9 '16 by Chet Miller
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You have a gas species dissolved in a liquid. The liquid is the solvent, and the gas species is the solute. Suppose that the gas phase in contact with the liquid consists of mixture of several gases …
answered Jun 9 '16 by Chet Miller
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Q is supposed to be calculated in terms of partial pressures, not moles. $\Delta G^0$ is based on a reversible process you have devised to take the pure reactants in stoichiometric proportions and 1 …
answered Mar 29 '17 by Chet Miller
5
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You should have written: $$\ce{C + O2 -> CO2}$$ and $$\ce{C + \frac{1}{2}O2 -> CO}$$ Then you should have determined what fraction of the carbon reacts by by the first reaction and what fracti …
answered Aug 22 '17 by Chet Miller
1
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When the compressibility factor z for CO2 is expressed in terms of reduced pressure and reduced temperature (i.e., using the law of corresponding states), the PVT behavior of CO2 is not very different …
answered Dec 24 '15 by Chet Miller
1
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There is a relationship between the equilibrium constant and the forward- and reverse kinetics reaction rate constants: $$K=\frac{k_f}{k_r}$$This relationship can be derived directly by setting the r …
answered Dec 17 '15 by Chet Miller
1
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If you apply an external pressure on an object and analyze the deformational response of the object (say using Hooke's law in 3D), you find that the state of stress and strain within the object are co …
answered Jan 19 '17 by Chet Miller
1
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They are implicitly assuming that the number of moles of ethane in solution is very small (in both cases) compared to the number of moles of the solvent. So, in both cases, the concentration of ethan …
answered Apr 14 '16 by Chet Miller
0
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For an ideal liquid solution, Raoult's law predicts that the partial pressure of a species in the gas phase is equal to the mole fraction of the species in the liquid phase times the equilibrium vapor …
answered Apr 7 '18 by Chet Miller
2
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For a massless piston, the force per unit area exerted by the gas on the inner face of the piston is exactly equal to the external pressure exerted by the surroundings on the outer face of the piston, …
answered Oct 26 '15 by Chet Miller
2
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I can't believe the way we solved the equation for the discriminant equal to zero. You and I both did the same thing. All we really needed to do is solve $R^2-\lambda = 0$ by writing $R^2=\lambda$, …
answered Nov 8 '15 by Chet Miller
0
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A coffee cup calorimeter is typically used for liquid phase reactions and, as such, generally involves little or no volume change. Under these circumstances $\Delta (PV)=P\Delta V$ is very close to z …
answered Apr 9 '16 by Chet Miller
2
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Starting with $dG=-SdT+VdP$, we have $$\left(\frac{\partial G}{\partial T}\right)_P=-S\tag{1}$$ But, from the equation $G = H - TS$, we also have:$$\left(\frac{\partial G}{\partial T}\right)_P=\left( …
answered Apr 6 '16 by Chet Miller
2
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Since G and S are taken to be zero at T = 0, H is also 0 at T = 0. So you can calculate H by integrating the heat capacity from 0 to T: $$H=\int_0^TC_pdT=\frac{a}{2}T^2+\frac{b}{4}T^4$$ Then you sub …
answered Jan 15 '16 by Chet Miller
2
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You can't do adiabatic reversible work at constant pressure. The pressure has to change. If you want to do adiabatic irreversible work at constant pressure, say by suddenly increasing or decreasing …
answered Feb 13 '17 by Chet Miller

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