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For questions about metals in general and their physical or chemical properties. For characteristic properties and reactions of d and f block metals specifically, use the [transition-metals] and [rare-earth-elements] tags respectively instead.

6
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fraught with difficulty and likely not useful in the first place. No matter where the line is drawn, there will be some compounds that will look strange for "barely being a metal", while others will be strange for "barely being a non-metal". …
answered May 10 '15 by Nicolau Saker Neto
22
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The relative energies of the electronic subshells have been calculated for atoms in the vicinity of $Z=20$ (J. Chem. Educ., 1994, 71 (6), 469), and the result is surprising: Looking at this graph, …
answered Feb 10 '14 by Nicolau Saker Neto
144
votes
This is a nice question, as it confronts a very replicable and common experience with a well established yet seemingly contradictory fact. As you expected, the smell of metal has nothing to do with … the metal actually getting into your nose, as most metals have far too low of a vapor pressure at ordinary temperatures to allow direct detection. The characteristic smell of metal, in fact, is caused …
answered Jan 20 '14 by Nicolau Saker Neto
10
votes
Sure. Even discounting non-equilibrium conditions, any substance which expands upon freezing will by symmetry melt under pressure, even if the pressure is caused by supporting its own weight. There's …
answered Jun 9 '15 by Nicolau Saker Neto
3
votes
Interesting question. There are free electrons and ions in a metal's gas phase, but even at rather high temperatures, they are relatively rare. The formation of free electrons is given by the reaction …
answered Apr 25 '13 by Nicolau Saker Neto