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This tag should be applied to questions concerning acid and base reactions. An acid is capable of donating a hydron/ proton (Brønsted acid) or capable of forming a covalent bond with an electron pair (Lewis acid). A base on the other hand is a chemical species/ molecular entity having an available pair of electrons capable of forming a covalent bond with a hydron/ proton (Brønsted base) or with the vacant orbital of some other species (Lewis base).

2
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I need to know if a combination of bleach and the chemicals below will create poisonous gas. Sodium laureth sulfate Sodium laureth sulfate is $\ce{CH3(CH2)11(OCH2CH2)_{\bf{3}}OSO3Na}$, where …
answered May 6 '15 by Curt F.
5
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Your code seems to be calculating the differences between a guessed concentration vector x and a calculated concentration vector. These differences in concentrations between guessed and calculated ar …
answered Aug 11 '15 by Curt F.
7
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Unfortunately Googling for "alkaline food" these days is a bad idea; results are dominated by nonsense sites espousing the "alkaline diet" nonsense / woo. There aren't many foods that are naturally a …
answered Aug 23 '15 by Curt F.
2
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Yes there is a rigorous way of calculating the enthalpy change. First write down an example reaction. It might not be as easy as you think. What species are really formed when zinc chloride (for …
answered Feb 25 '16 by Curt F.
3
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Sodium oxide is not a base in either the Bronsted-Lowry or Arrhenius senses. It is technically a base anhydride, meaning that it can be hydrated to yield a base: $$\ce{Na2O + H2O -> 2NaOH}$$ Carb …
answered Mar 12 '15 by Curt F.
4
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You say: I searched everywhere, but I didn't get the answer. When I type youtube gold recovery from chloroauric acid into Google, the first link is to a Youtube video with a visible demonstrati …
answered Jul 1 by Curt F.
4
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The first step is to write down the variables of interest, and the equations that relate them. If there exactly as many (non-redundant) equations as variables, then the system might be solvable. In …
answered Feb 27 '15 by Curt F.
3
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I don't think this question has an answer. First, muscle soreness is not caused by lactic acid. Second, distance runners run aerobically, meaning very little lactic acid would be generated by runni …
answered Sep 27 '16 by Curt F.
3
votes
In 1981, Nishikata et al. published Viscosities of Aqueous Hydrochloric Acid Solutions, and Densities and Viscosities of Aqueous Hydroiodic Acid Solutions in the Journal of Chemical Engineering Data. …
answered Jul 2 by Curt F.
16
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The claim that lemon water is alkaline is simply wrong. However, that hasn't stopped people from claiming that it's true: Lemons are an incredibly alkaline food, believe it or not. Yes, they are …
answered Oct 6 '16 by Curt F.
5
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One chemical equation that can be written for nitrogenase is this one: $\ce{N_2 + 8 \ H^+ + 8 \ e^- + 16 \ ATP \longrightarrow 2 \ NH_3 + H_2 + 16 \ ADP + 16 P_{i}}$ The equation shows that not only …
answered Jun 23 '15 by Curt F.
3
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It doesn't matter which reaction you take. The short answer as to why is that adding the reaction $\ce{2H2O <-> H3O+ +OH-}$ to the latter reaction gives you the former. And that water dissociation …
answered Feb 10 '15 by Curt F.
8
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There are two reasons. As mentioned by Ivan Neretin in the comments, carbonate is the conjugate base of a much weaker acid than chloride is the conjugate base of. In other words, carbonic acid is l …
answered Oct 1 '15 by Curt F.
1
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Both your teacher and your answer are wrong! There are two steps to this problem. First, we need to convert between mass fractions and mole fractions. Second, we need to convert from a per-amount …
answered Oct 10 '16 by Curt F.
12
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Most of the odor of cloves comes from volatile molecules, especially eugenol, found in the cloves. Eugenol is a water-immiscible, oily liquid at ambient temperatures. Plastic with resin identifictio …
answered Apr 9 '15 by Curt F.

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