All Questions

16
votes
2answers
260 views

What are the mechanisms for capture of As(III) and As(V) by magnetite from water?

Magnetite, $\ce{Fe3O4}$ is able to capture $\ce{As(III)}$ and $\ce{As(V)}$ from drinking water through the following mechanisms. Bidentate-binuclear complex Monodentate-binuclear complex (both from ...
7
votes
1answer
7k views

Is Blue Silica Gel more harmful than the Orange ones?

I am currently searching for a portable dehumidifier but notice that most of them come with a indicator that actually using the Blue Silica Gel, which I believe that it may contain Cobalt Chloride. ...
16
votes
1answer
2k views

What material are heat bags made of?

I just bought a heat bag from store and it has special property. It is made up of transparent plastic bag and transparent unknown liquid inside when sold. There is a tiny circular metal piece in ...
7
votes
1answer
688 views

Are these two space groups in a group–subgroup relationship?

Given two crystal space groups, how can one determine if they are in a group-subgroup relationship? The specific case at hand is P 21/m 2/m 2/a (aka P m m a, #51) and P m m 2 (#25), but knowing how to ...
20
votes
2answers
1k views

Why don't trigonal S and P compounds undergo inversion at room temperature?

Most molecules containing nitrogen atoms in trigonal pyramid configuration undergo a relatively fast process of inversion at room temperature. On the other hand, the free energy barrier for phosphines,...
8
votes
1answer
86 views

Retention of surface texture after combustion

Just some while ago I was burning a box of cardboard in my backyard and I saw a very curious phenomenon. I saw that as the cardboard box started burning it started to curl. Up after a while as I ...
9
votes
1answer
190 views

Why is fabrication of ordered graphite substrates difficult?

While reading this paper (suggested by @Janice here), I came across the following line: Surface reconstruction is known to be extremely important for Si, the material of 20th century electronics. ...
21
votes
1answer
6k views

What does “reaction coordinate” mean? What does it mean when a reaction has TWO reaction coordinates?

I'm familiar with the concept of a reaction coordinate from high school chemistry as some generic conformational parameter that all of the intermediate states of a chemical reaction lie upon. Recently,...
16
votes
2answers
280 views

Is circularly polarized light ever used to isolate particular chiralities?

Chiral molecules tend to absorb one circular polarization of light more than the other. Is this ever used to isolate a particular enantiomer?
161
votes
8answers
126k views

Can an atom have more than 8 valence electrons? If not, why is 8 the limit?

According to some chemistry textbooks, the maximum number of valence electrons for an atom is 8, but the reason for this is not explained. So, can an atom have more than 8 valence electrons? If ...
16
votes
1answer
4k views

How are non-carbon stereogenic centers named (S/R)?

The R/S naming system for stereocenters relies on the Cahn–Ingold–Prelog priority rules to rank the four substituents of a stereocenter; the R or S name is then attributed depending on the spatial ...
10
votes
3answers
246 views

How can I perform structure alignment on an inorganic species?

I'm attempting to perform atomistic optimal structure alignment on an inorganic species. Can anyone point me in the right direction to software or a technique for performing this? There exists a wide ...
27
votes
3answers
495 views

What makes a radical 'free'?

The qualifier 'free' seems to be ubiquitously attached to discussion of radicals as highly reactive species with unpaired spins. What, precisely (or imprecisely, as the case may be) does 'free' really ...
14
votes
1answer
611 views

Are there any examples of nuclear spin isomers having consequences for chemical reactivity?

Ortho- and parahydrogen are two forms of the $\ce{H2}$ molecule that are distinguished by their pairing or antipairing of nuclear spins, giving rise to metastable singlet (ortho-) and triplet (para-) ...
41
votes
1answer
8k views

Why does sulfur, but not oxygen, catenate?

Oxygen is a rather boring element. It has only two allotropes, dioxygen and ozone. Dioxygen has a double bond, and ozone has a delocalised cloud, giving rise to two "1.5 bonds". On the other hand, ...
15
votes
2answers
719 views

Edges of graphite

I've been asked this question a few times, and while I think I know the answer, I'd like to know more. Graphite, as we know, is a sheet polymer. Since polymers are bound to be finite by physical ...
16
votes
3answers
15k views

Why do Magnesium and Lithium form *covalent* organometallic compounds?

Lithium and magnesium are Group 1 and Group 2 elements respectively. Elements of these groups are highly ionic, and I've never heard of them forming significantly covalent inorganic compounds. Yet ...
16
votes
2answers
1k views

By what reaction does (–)-sparteine decompose in ambient conditions?

In its pure form (–)-sparteine is an only-slightly-yellow clear, viscous liquid. Yet, after only a week of being kept in dry, normal atmosphere (in a round bottom flask covered by a septa), some of it ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Is soap the natural form of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate?

I was told that "Sodium Tallowate, sodium cocoate and sodium palm kernelate are the 'natural' forms of SLS". Is this true? I thought "natural" SLS would be SLS derived from a natural product such as ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

What is it about the relationship between the Fe²⁺ and Fe³⁺ in magnetite that makes it diamagnetic?

Hematite is composed of $\ce{Fe2O3}$, and is paramagnetic, whereas magnetite is $\ce{Fe3O4}$ and is diamagnetic. Magnetite's nature is due to the presence of both $\ce{Fe^{2+}}$ and $\ce{Fe^{3+}}$ (...
25
votes
7answers
14k views

Why is AgCl less soluble than AgNO₃?

Related: Reaction between silver nitrate and aluminum chloride Experimentally, $\ce{AgCl}$ is insoluble in water, but $\ce{AgNO3}$ is soluble. They're pretty common in a lab (well, $\ce{AgCl}$ is a ...
21
votes
4answers
38k views

what kind of suspension liquid should be used with ferrofluid (so it does not stain the glass)

Please take a look at the following video: I am working on a new project, and I need to find whats the best liquid to hold ferrofluid inside the glass (or maybe even plastic) container, so that ...
7
votes
2answers
4k views

How long does it take to run a MS/MS experiment

I am not planning to do these types of experiments but I would like to know the order of magnitude of the time it takes to run an LC-MS/MS experiment. Let's assume that I have the sample prep (protein)...
4
votes
1answer
120 views

Solution based measurement of Solvent-Accessible Surface Area of macromolecules

The Solvent-Accessible Surface Area (SASA) is a valuable metric for looking at protein folding and protein-protein interactions. However, this measurement is typically done by calculating the SASA ...
12
votes
2answers
1k views

Why is slush hydrogen at the triple point?

Slush hydrogen is a mixture of liquid and solid hydrogen at the triple point considered as a possible vehicle fuel. What is the need of having it at the triple point? Couldn't any other set of ...
10
votes
1answer
3k views

What's the difference between precipitate and turbidity?

In many tests for various radicals, a "<color> precipitate" or "<color> turbidity" is mentioned. For example, lead ...
8
votes
2answers
21k views

Why are strong acids and bases not suitable as primary standards?

This is one of the questions with which I have puzzled over, and can arrive at no definite conclusion. Why are strong acids or bases, such as $\ce{H2SO4}$,$\ce{ HNO3}$, $\ce{HCl}$, and $\ce{NaOH}$ not ...
-16
votes
3answers
26k views

Temperature of pure oxygen combustion [closed]

What is the temperature of pure oxygen being combusted? I was wondering about it.
7
votes
1answer
242 views

Rotation energy barrier for carboxypyrazolate

In this molecule, which is 3,5-dimethyl-4-carboxypyrazolate (unless I got it wrong): I do not think there is free rotation around the bond indicated in red, because one can write a resonance ...
7
votes
2answers
133 views

How to understand this form of writing the solution: (some salt • n H₂O)?

For example — "high purity chloride salt of Zinc $(\ce{ZnCl2.2H2O})$" or "various concentrations of $\ce{FeCl2.4H2O}$". What does the number before $\ce{H2O}$ mean?
11
votes
3answers
13k views

Reaction between silver nitrate and aluminum chloride

I googled a bit about what $\ce{AgNO3 + AlCl3}$ will yield and found out the following: $\ce{3AgNO3 + AlCl3 -> Al(NO3)3 + 3AgCl}$ Why is that? I know that $\ce{Ag}$ is higher up in the reactivity ...
16
votes
1answer
3k views

Why does gum get harder to chew after a while?

My Sister asked me this: "Why is it that when we chew gum, it is soft and mushy to begin with , but slowly gets firmer and firmer like after 20 mins of chewing?" I think it is because when we ...
8
votes
1answer
218 views

What does the charge distribution around a Stone-Wales defect look like?

I'm reading a book on carbon nanotubes (P.J.F. Harris, Carbon Nanotube Science, to be specific) at the moment and puzzling about Stone-Wales or 5775 defects. This is where two adjacent carbons undergo ...
21
votes
1answer
432 views

Is the Springborg 6D phase space model used in modern molecular orbital modeling?

In a series of papers in the early 1980s, Michael Springborg explored an interpretation of the Wigner phase space function as an electron density in a six-dimensional $(q,p)$ phase space. He applied ...
40
votes
8answers
40k views

Is iron in the brown ring compound in a +1 oxidation state?

In the standard brown ring test for the nitrate ion, the brown ring complex is: $$\ce{[Fe(H2O)5(NO)]^{2+}}$$ In this compound, the nitrosyl ligand is positively charged, and iron is in a $+1$ ...
-6
votes
1answer
1k views

How to compute molecular formula?

I have the following question to solve: Tungsten, $\ce{W}$, and chlorine, $\ce{Cl}$, form a series of compounds with the following compositions: \begin{array}{rr} \text{Mass % W} & \text{...
4
votes
1answer
668 views

Predict XPS Spectrum of Organic Monolayers on a Semiconductor

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a particularly useful technique for examining the surfaces of all sorts of materials. Organic monolayers are particularly difficult to characterize completely ...
4
votes
1answer
458 views

How is silica bead bonded into polystyrene?

What kind of bonds silica bead forms with polystyrene? Silica is now as ~100 $\mu$m spherical particles in bulk polystyrene that is made by melting. How can I bond the silica particles more tightly ...
7
votes
1answer
100 views

Has QTPIE ever been applied to 1D metals such as polyacetylene?

QTPIE is a fluctuating charge model that substantially improves modeling of polarization and charge transfer. I was curious whether it has ever been applied to 1D metals such as polyacetylene to ...
14
votes
1answer
5k views

How are $\sigma$ and $\sigma^\pm$ determined in Hammett plots?

The Hammett plot is commonly invoked in organic chemistry to reason about the plausibility (or implausibility) of various reaction mechanisms. The vertical axis is essentially the logarithm of an ...
8
votes
1answer
648 views

Why are there no edge dislocations in a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice?

In crystallography, we know that the Burgers vector is parallel to the dislocation direction in a screw dislocation, and perpendicular in a edge dislocation. Furthermore, I have in my lecture notes "...
20
votes
2answers
25k views

Why are the majority of cleaning solutions basic?

When testing for pH for common household cleaning products, such as dishwasher fluid, I noticed that majority of them tend to be basic? Why is that? Do acid make good cleaning solutions as well?
8
votes
1answer
910 views

What is the difference between an angular and linear skeletal formula?

When drawing a skeletal formula, what is the difference between an angular version and a linear version? I was asked to draw the Z isomer of Resveratrol: For which I drew: However the markscheme ...
22
votes
5answers
830 views

Why are equations of state for a non-ideal gas so elusive?

The ideal gas equation (daresay "law") is a fascinating combination of the work of dozens of scientists over a long period of time. I encountered Van der Waals interpretation for non-ideal gases ...
3
votes
2answers
10k views

Why does activated carbon preferentially adsorb anions?

Brands like Brita and Pur (in the U.S.) have made a name for themselves for the ability of their product (essentially a large-pore filter with activated carbon/charcoal) to extract the added chlorine ...
17
votes
2answers
5k views

Not your ordinary hard water deposit

We have a well that delivers hard water and we do not have a water softener. (There was a “green sand filter” that utilizes permanganate to oxidize other metals on the system, but it has been ...
26
votes
3answers
19k views

Why does ice cream make soda fizz?

I've noticed that adding a chunk of ice cream to soda makes the soda fizz slightly near the soda-ice cream interface. I thought it was a physical effect due to the temperature, but adding ice has no ...
10
votes
2answers
5k views

How does one recognized Td/Oh symmetry in molecules?

The identification of point groups of a molecule is usually done following a strict scheme, either manually or algorithmically. In all textbooks I could find, however, the first step of the scheme is ...
18
votes
1answer
631 views

When simulating spectral line broadening, which convolution is preferred?

Many computational chemistry packages permit the calculation of vibrational and electronic spectra. These spectra are obtained as a set of discrete eigenvalues however they are often convolved with ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

Are there endothermic dissolution reactions? [closed]

Are there reactions like $X(s) + n Y(l) \to X \centerdot Y_n(l)$ that are endothermic? What are X and Y then? The material X should also be soluble to material Y.

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