Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions regarding how something is referred to.

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13
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2answers
593 views

Help understanding how “steric effects” are distinct from “electronic effects”?

@jakebeal's excellent answer to Why do animal cells “mistake” rubidium ions for potassium ions? includes the following passage: In the case of potassium versus sodium, which are both very important ...
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1answer
43 views

Is Combinatorial Chemistry related to combinatorics in math?

If the answer is no, then I don't understand the adjective "Combinatorial". Barring decompositions, aren't the five main types of chemical reactions combinatorial? You must combine at least ...
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0answers
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Exactly how the subscripted numbers are given to the different types of boron sheets (borophenes)?

I was going to start a project on Borophene, and hence I was going through a review journal, 2D Boron: Boraphene, Borophene, Boronene, where they have said many types of borophenes had been proposed. ...
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4answers
3k views

Why “monoxide” but not “diodine”?

When naming compounds, sometimes when there are two vowels in a row the second is elided: this happens for example with "mono-oxide", which becomes "monoxide" instead. Why is this ...
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0answers
28 views

What is the proper use of the term “pi-donor ligand”?

Robert Crabtree's The Organometallic Chemistry of the Transition Metals (7e) describes a pi-donor ligand as being a pi-donor "as a result of the lone pairs that are left after one lone pair has ...
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1answer
48 views

Are there terms for ions of chlorine other than chloride?

An ion of chlorine with a charge of −1 is called a chloride ion/anion. Are there terms for other ions of chlorine, for example, $\ce{Cl+}$ or $\ce{Cl^2-}?$
1
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1answer
53 views

Who coined the term “gas evolution reaction”?

I found a paper from 1812 which specifically mentions the evolution of a gas [1]. There is a similar reference from 1808, except it uses the term evolution to speak of green light emitted when a ...
6
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1answer
175 views

Exact meaning of “degree of crosslinking” in polymer chemistry

In the ion-exchange chromatography literature, a term "degree of crosslinking" appears frequently. Ion exchange resins are typically made from divinylbenzene and styrene. One of the stated ...
2
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1answer
243 views

Which one of the following is NOT a haloalkane? [closed]

Which one of the following is NOT a haloalkane? A) Freon B) Teflon C) Iodoform D) Vinyl chloride Every compound here seems to me as a haloalkane: Freon, Teflon, iodoform, and vinyl chloride. My text ...
2
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2answers
91 views

What is the difference in mosM and mOsm units, if there is any at all?

I'm reading Agre's paper on aquaporins [1] and he uses a unit called "mosM" throughout the paper, for example: … ocytes were transferred from 200 mosM to 70 mosM modified Barth's buffer. I ...
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2answers
62 views

Is reforming and isomerization the same thing?

Okay, just to give an idea of my current understanding. Reforming is a step one can do after one has cracked some hydrocarbons. As such, the process of reforming is dependent on a separate process, ...
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0answers
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What is the definition of energy-independent basis?

I am reading this article by Zatsarinny and Fischer [1]. At some point they span a wave function $\Psi_{E}$ in terms of energy independent basis $$\Psi_{E}=\sum_{k} A_{E k} \Psi_{k}$$ For example, The ...
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2answers
577 views

Meaning of the Term “Heavy Metals” in CofA?

I've always wondered, what is the meaning of the following terms on a certificate of analysis: "Heavy Metals" "Heavy Metals (as Pb)" What exactly is comprised in "heavy ...
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0answers
28 views

Name of proton directly bonded to a functional group e.g. carbonyl

For example, a carbon bonded to a carbonyl group is the alpha carbon, and has alpha protons. Following that there are beta and gamma carbons and protons. Is there a specific name for the proton in an ...
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2answers
218 views

Why are alkenes considered nonpolar?

Alkenes have C–C sigma bonds, C=C pi bonds, and also C–H sigma bonds. I know that C–C and C=C bonds will not give any polarity, but what about the C–H bond? I think it should give some polarity ...
7
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3answers
480 views

Can precipitation occur in states of matter other than liquids?

This answer to Are precipitation and crystallization both analogous between chemistry and meteorology? discusses the history and use of the term "precipitation" in chemistry. From what I ...
3
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1answer
104 views

Are precipitation and crystallization both analogous between Chemistry and Meteorology?

A comment under the Space SE question Is there really precipitation on Mars? Does frost count? brings up the use of the term "precipitation" in chemistry and we wonder if precipitation in ...
6
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2answers
2k views

What is the intuition behind 'mol' as a unit 'symbol'

Why are moles written with 'mol' as opposed to something which is easier to write with one character, or even two?
8
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1answer
458 views

What do “USP 26” and “USP 42” mean?

I am being asked by a colleague if the Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) we buy in our lab is "USP 26" or "USP 42". I've never heard those terms before. I searched up online but found ...
2
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1answer
248 views

How many covalent bonds are there in carbon suboxide?

Calculate the number of covalent bonds in $\ce{C3O2}$. Structure: I am confused. I can count covalent bonds as 8 by counting single-single bonds, but also I can say that there are 4 "double ...
1
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1answer
35 views

What are coexistent metals?

In ACS Sustainable Chem. Eng. 2018, 6 (10), 12542–12561, I saw the term "coexistent metals", but I could not find a definition for that on the Internet. So what does it mean? Karapinar et ...
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1answer
84 views

Terminologies used in isomerism [closed]

What is the difference between the terms constitutional isomers, stereoisomers, geometric isomers? I know cis and trans-1,2-dichloroethane shows cis trans isomerism and 1,1 dichloroethene, 1,1,2 ...
4
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1answer
223 views

What exactly are electron states?

From Tro's Chemistry: Structure and Properties [1, p. 93]: 2.5 Quantum Mechanics and the Atom As we have seen, the position and velocity of the electron are complementary properties—if we know one ...
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1answer
1k views

What is a Herzberg?

Whatman lists the flow rates for their filters in a unit called a 'Herzberg': What is this? I've been searching around and I did find information about Herzberg flow rate testers, for example this ...
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2answers
112 views

Confusion with definitions of mass [duplicate]

What is the difference between: atomic mass relative atomic weight relative isotopic weight standard atomic weight atomic weight relative atomic mass I am told by Wikipedia that: relative atomic ...
2
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0answers
31 views

What is “protein redox conformation”?

From an article by Frye et al. [1]: Reduced glutathione (GSH) is the major intracellular redox buffer and is essential in free radical scavenging, redox homeostasis, maintenance of protein redox ...
2
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1answer
110 views

Cis and trans electrodes

I have come across use of the terms cis and trans electrodes in the context of nanopores and driving charged biomolecules through a pore using an electric field [1]: FIG. 1. Drawing of the cis ...
7
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1answer
707 views

What is the unit of Z effective?

Z effective is the net positive charge experienced by an electron. But what is the unit of this net charge: coulomb (C) or microcoulomb (μC), or something else?
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2answers
880 views

How can magnesium hydroxide be a strong base and be sparingly soluble at the same time?

A strong base means it completely dissociates forming $ OH^- $ ions when added to aqueous solution. Sparingly soluble means it dissolves very little when added to aqueous solution. Yet magnesium ...
1
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1answer
64 views

Meaning of “MS1 and MS2 resolution” and “MS1 and MS2: Unit” in a tandem mass-spectrometry parameter list

I'm translating a Certificate of Suitability that very briefly describes procedures used to measure several impurities in a drug substance. There is a short description of the parameters of a Gas ...
1
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1answer
72 views

Where to find a comprehensive list of chemical/biochemical etymologies?

I've found lists like this, which explain what different root words mean. But I'm looking for explanations of why those roots mean those things. For example, why does carbonyl refer to a carbon double ...
8
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2answers
545 views

What is an ambident substrate?

I had to identify whether a few compounds are ambident substrates or not. However, as I did not know the term, I took to googling it, but I could not find any explanation for this group anywhere. I ...
4
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2answers
263 views

SMILES string convertors

I'm new to SMILES strings, and have noticed that they're not standardised. Firstly, what is the reason for different structures of SMILES strings to represent the same compound? Why not have a ...
0
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2answers
98 views

Definition of “solution” [closed]

In my textbook “solutions” are defined as follows: Homogenous mixtures of two or more substances are known as solutions. Should the two substances always be non-reacting? The definition has no ...
4
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1answer
344 views

What do 'sigma' and 'pi' in front of ligands in the formula of a coordination compound mean?

The following coordination compound was given in the book Concise Inorganic Chemistry by J.D. Lee (Adapted by Sudarsan Guha) under the topic 'Effective Atomic Number (EAN)': $\ce{[Ti(\sigma -C5H5)2 (\...
4
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1answer
248 views

Verb for Sorption

Slightly silly question! Intuitively I want the present-simple verb for sorption to be "sorps", but saying it out loud, "sorbs" sounds much more natural. However, Google doesn't turn anything up for ...
5
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1answer
3k views

Naming of [Pt(py)4][PtCl4]

Why is $\ce{[Pt(py)4][PtCl4]}$ called tetrakis(pyridine)platinum(II) tetrachloridoplatinate(II) and not tetrapyridineplatinum(II) tetrachloridoplatinate(II)? I thought you use tetrakis for ligands ...
5
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1answer
71 views

What is the naming convention for Sn and Pb in inter-metallic compounds?

How would one go about naming inter-metallic (specifically, transition post-transition) compounds containing tin and lead? It is usually easy figuring out the naming of such compounds as they follow ...
8
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2answers
326 views

Why can't ligands with “locked structures” undergo chelation?

The following quote is from the book Concise Inorganic Chemistry by J.D. Lee (Adapted by Sudarsan Guha), from the chapter "Coordination Compounds", page 177: ...it must be noted that $\ce{NH2NH2}$ ...
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3answers
3k views

Can a solvent be a solid?

Can a solvent be a solid? I do not think so. But is it possible for a solvent to be a solid?
0
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1answer
53 views

Determining solvent and solute [closed]

On which conditions does determining solvent depend on? 1. the higher boiling indicates the solvent the material with the higher concentration is the solvent the solvent is kept first in a pot. ...
3
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5answers
992 views

Can a solvent be a gas?

A solvent is an element which dissolves something, basically the solute. Normally, all the solvents we encounter are in liquid phase. So, I was wondering if there could be any solvent in a gaseous ...
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1answer
324 views

Wouldn't a better term for smoking Crystal meth be condensing or vaporizing?

There isn't actually any chemical reaction taking place. The meth is heated, first it melts, then it vaporizes, but in the process it doesn't mix with other chemicals. It just merely changes state. ...
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0answers
56 views

Difference between calcination, roasting and pyrolysis

Hie everyone. I have been going through pyrometallurgical processes for recycling lithium-ion batteries and l have been coming across these terms; calcination, pyrolysis and roasting which l need ...
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2answers
106 views

What is heterogeneous catalysis in gas phase?

Give examples of heterogeneous catalysis (i) in gas phase and (ii) in liquid phase. Now, I came to know that heterogeneous catalysis involves different phases between the catalyst used and the ...
1
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1answer
43 views

Is it appropriate to call this material a hybrid composite? [closed]

The material I've synthesised is made up of two primary parts at a 1:1 ratio: Part 1: agar, glycerol, water. Part 2: polyurethane resin. The agar mixture on its own was too soft, so I added the ...
0
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1answer
69 views

Hydrogen peroxide / sodium or potassium permanganate: reaction type

I have some people on youtube stating the steam generating reaction of $$\ce{3H2O2 + 2KMnO4 → 3O2 + 2MnO2 + 2KOH + 2H2O}$$ is catalytic, from where I'm sitting it is purely stoichiometric. Can ...
6
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1answer
238 views

Clarification of textbook concepts relating to “perfect”, “ideal”, and “real” gases

My textbook, Atkins' Physical Chemistry, 11th edition, by Atkins, de Paula, and Keeler, says the following: The resulting expression $$pV = nRT \tag{1A.4}$$ is the perfect gas law (or ...
0
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1answer
384 views

Is terylene a copolymer?

Terylene is a polyester made from terephthallic acid and ethylene glycol. Even though we use two reagents, they undergo esterification to give bis(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalate (monomer) which then ...
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0answers
34 views

Definition of a Homologous Series

My textbook states that members of a homologous series have the same general formula (ex. $\ce{C_{n}H_{2n}}$ for alkenes) as they only differ from one to another by additional $\ce{CH_2}$ (methylene) ...

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