Skip to main content

Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions relating to terminology and naming conventions in chemistry.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
-1 votes
1 answer
61 views

Is the acceleration of the low-temperature allotropic conversion of β-form white tin by the presence of α-form grey tin really considered catalysis?

discussion of the allotropes of sulfur in Melting point of sulfur and comments below reminded me of Napoleon's buttons, cf. Tin pest; Allotropic transformation. That section in its entirety reads: At ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 5,822
-3 votes
0 answers
28 views

Are insoluble ionic bases strong or weak

According to my chemistry textbook (holt rinehart), Al(OH)3 is a weak base because it’s not very soluble. By applying that logic can Mg(OH)2 be considered as a weak base? A quick google search will ...
Sarwar's user avatar
  • 3
3 votes
2 answers
182 views

Does "concentration gradient" refer to the amount of all solutes, or a specific solute moving across a membrane?

I'm struggling with something that seems really simple, and I think it's because I'm stuck on the definition of concentration gradients. If you have a solution with a moderate concentration of ...
Riles's user avatar
  • 49
7 votes
1 answer
753 views

What is laboratory air?

Oftentimes in the literature, particularly for oxidation studies, the authors mention that experiments were performed in "laboratory air." Is there any distinction from laboratory air from ...
rmza7's user avatar
  • 939
3 votes
1 answer
100 views

Does CsBr have BCC lattice or cubic?

Everywhere I see on the internet, it says BCC, but my professor still says "it is cubic lattice, no matter which book/website might tell you otherwise". The argument was that for deciding ...
Sudarshan Kulkarni's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
2k views

Why are "vinylic" and "allylic" carbons named so?

I find it hard to remember which is "vinylic" and "allylic" carbon, so I feel it would be easier to remember if I know the reason why they are named so, like their word root ...
saromitha kumar XA mem's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
89 views

Can species with diffrent number of electrons be isoelectronic?

According to IUPAC gold book- Does this meam that 2 species with diffrent electron number, but same valence electrons, be considered isoelectronic Say a molecule XY and ZY where X and Z belong to the ...
ThatApollo777's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
273 views

Principal quantum number and 'good' quantum numbers

When we discuss about configurations we specify n, l, m quantum numbers for the individual electrons. My question is: why when we pass from configurations to atomic terms in order to use the total ...
Chemistry.'s user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
259 views

How to pronounce Aʹα-helix?

The LOV protein structure contains a Jα- and an Aʹα-helix. Would “A prime alpha helix” be the correct pronunciation for Aʹα-helix? I'm speaking soon in front of the scientists in the field that I ...
Andrea Flores-Ibarra's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
439 views

What is alkalimetry?

I've found two answers. One says its the determination of concentration of unknown alkali solution with the help of standard acid solution. The other says it as the determination of concentration of ...
heisenberg's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
189 views

What is the meaning of "proto" in nomenclature?

"Proto" is generally used to describe "first", "foremost" or "earliest form of (something)" indicating something primitive that transforms into something known ...
Nilay Ghosh's user avatar
  • 25.9k
2 votes
2 answers
141 views

Does the word "restraint" have any special meaning in the case of protein or biochemistry?

The following screenshot is taken from the book The Encyclopedia of Physical Science & Technology, volume: Biochemistry, Edition: 3rd, Page-197. The text says: FIGURE 3 Schematic representation ...
user avatar
-2 votes
2 answers
113 views

Is the hydrolysis of a salt produced by neutralisation a secondary reaction? [closed]

I understand that in a solution, the salt created by a neutralisation reaction can react again with water molecules, which can further affect the pH. Is it correct to say that the hydrolysis of salts ...
cabbagesss's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
353 views

What's the relation between two symmetry groups, if one has all the symmetry of the other and some more?

Question: Consider two molecular symmetry groups, for example $C_s$ and $C_{2v}$. $C_s$ has one inversion plane, and two irreductible representations: the symmetric $A'$, and the antisymmetric $A''$. ...
Neinstein's user avatar
  • 239
5 votes
2 answers
390 views

Looking for terminology for when a hygroscopic chemical gets moisture in it

Scenario: A jar of zinc chloride (which is very hygroscopic) is left on a shelf in a chemistry classroom for several years. You open it and it is hard. What is the word to describe that? It was ...
Jessica Sargent's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
340 views

What does the 'S' stand for in base-centered cubic crystals and Bravais lattices?

The 'I' used for body-centered systems is for the German word Innenzentriert and the 'F' for face-centered is for Flächenzentriert, also German but what about the 'S' for a, b, or c base-centered ...
Kurt Hikes's user avatar
  • 1,813
3 votes
1 answer
104 views

What does it mean when a molecule is described as "optically stable"?

In this question about "Why don't trigonal S and P compounds undergo inversion at room temperature?", phosphines, sulfoniums and sulfoxides are described as "optically stable", ...
David Bailey's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
435 views

Do hydration (as in "solvation") and "hydration" of salts refer to the same phenomenon?

I've come across two use cases of the word "hydration", presented to me as distinct topics: Solvation is the process of reorganizing solvent and solute molecules into solvation complexes ...
Arham Jain's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
82 views

Phrasing for processes that "create" Entropy?

In many circumstances, in the real world, systems aren't "closed" in any meaningful sense. So, when I burn a log in a fireplace, I can use words to artificially set up a kind of "log ...
Him's user avatar
  • 133
3 votes
2 answers
186 views

Is there a good synonym for "a group connected to a N-atom"?

I'm writing a publication in which I compare the effect of alkyl, alkene and similar chains of different length connected to a N-atom of a heterocyclic organic compound. Often I have to refer to these ...
Neinstein's user avatar
  • 239
3 votes
1 answer
113 views

Standard suffixes for compounds?

Long ago, I learned that suffixes like -ide, -ate, -ose, etc. had specific meanings. Now, I'm seeing all these drug ads on TV with generic names that all end in -ab or -ib.  Do these have a standard ...
WGroleau's user avatar
  • 209
2 votes
1 answer
152 views

Why is guanine sometimes referred to as "Acyclovir Impurity B"?

"Acyclovir Impurity B" is the name for guanine used by a handful of relatively low-traffic websites. Googling the term shows this. It is nearly always with a capital letter at the beginning ...
Matthew Christopher Bartsh's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
64 views

What does "acidic" mean in an article on hydrogen boride nanosheets?

From Rojas et al. [1] (emphasis mine): On the other hand, we found that proton exchange with HB occurs in water with the estimated $\mathrm{p}K_\mathrm{a}$ of $3.5\pm 0.2,$ even after reactive sites ...
hoggywoggy's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
408 views

IUPAC naming of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) heterocyclic core and its locants

Wikipedia article about LSD says its IUPAC name is (6aR,9R)-N,N-diethyl-7-methyl-4,6,6a,7,8,9-hexahydroindolo[4,3-fg]quinoline-9-carboxamide which is quite complex. Especially its didehydroergoline ...
Matthew Christopher Bartsh's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
2k views

What is the difference between technical-grade and food-grade tripotassium phosphate?

There is an article about tripotassium phosphate that states the following: Consumers may have health concerns about why this cleaning agent can be used in food, but that is the technical grade, not ...
trndjc's user avatar
  • 171
-1 votes
2 answers
237 views

Relation between activation and threshold energies

Activation energy $E_\mathrm{a}$ and threshold energy $E_0$ appear to be equivalent quantities: In particle physics, the threshold energy for production of a particle is the minimum kinetic energy a ...
Jorge Bonifaz's user avatar
-2 votes
2 answers
3k views

Can an element be a single atom or a molecule made up of atoms of the same element?

Some online websites and some books as well suggest that elements are either atoms (e.g. Ne) or molecules (e.g. $\ce{H2}$, $\ce{O2}$). Original source: Tro, Chemistry: A Molecular Approach (2008) ...
Level1's user avatar
  • 23
10 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is a "formal" dimer?

I was researching for this question and I noticed the term "formal dimer": Hyponitrous acid is a chemical compound with formula $\ce{H2N2O2}$ or $\ce{HON=NOH}$. It is an isomer of nitramide,...
Nilay Ghosh's user avatar
  • 25.9k
3 votes
1 answer
238 views

Definition of mineralisation in context of organic chemistry

What does it mean when an organic compound, say methylene blue, is said to be mineralised? An accompanied equation shows the dye being converted into carbon dioxide and oxygen. The only results I have ...
watermelonnn's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
753 views

Meaning of equivalents in organic synthesis

The use of "equivalents" as used in titrations/chemical analysis is an obsolete concept except in some countries. The original meaning of equivalent weights is the weight of a compound that ...
AChem's user avatar
  • 40.8k
-1 votes
1 answer
89 views

Branch of chemistry that deals with reactions between chemicals [closed]

There are branches of chemistry like physical chemistry that hardly involve chemical reactions. Whereas, inorganic and organic chemistries pretty much definitely have a lot of chemical reactions ...
Balu's user avatar
  • 73
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Why is active sec-pentyl group called so?

My teacher as well as Wikipedia — Pentyl group use the following names for the “pentyl” groups: Group name Structure with attachment point 1 active sec-pentyl 2 sec-pentyl 3 active pentyl If a ...
Arpit Raj Choudhary's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
52 views

Is there an equivalent term for favourable and non-favourable entropy?

For Gibbs energy, we have 'exergonic' or 'endergonic' For Enthalpy, we have 'exothermic' or 'endothermic' It seems logical there should be an equivalent pair of terms for entropy, but I can't seem to ...
tgsweat's user avatar
  • 23
0 votes
1 answer
131 views

What does the word "dynamics" mean in the context of proteins or biomolecules in general?

What does it mean by “dynamics” when we say “dynamics of protein” or “dynamics of biomolecules”? For instance, McCammon's paper has the title "Protein Dynamics" [1]. What does the word “...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

What is the burette solution called in a titration, when its concentration is unknown?

Generally in titration, the unknown solution is in the conical flask, called the analyte; the standard solution is in the burette, called the titrant. How do the terminologies change when one swaps ...
joshua mason's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
475 views

How do you write fractional hydrates in words?

Apart from sequihydrate and hemihydrate (1.5 and 0.5 respectively), I can't find a way to write any other fractional hydrates. Wikipedia states: The notation "hydrated compound⋅nH2O", where ...
Praseodymium-141's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
185 views

Can denticity and hapticity be defined simulaneously for a ligand?

I am freshly studying coordination chemistry. What I understand from denticity and hapticity is: Denticity - no. of electron donating sites in a ligand. Hapticity - no. of electron donating atoms in a ...
FirstAxiom's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Can a spontaneous reaction have zero or negative activation energy?

Is it possible for a certain spontaneous reaction to have zero or negative activation energy? My high school teacher explains that it shouldn't be possible since it breaks the Arrhenius equation, ...
Karan's user avatar
  • 73
0 votes
2 answers
335 views

Formal way to say bubble / bubbling

I know this question might seem too simplistic but I've been looking everywhere for a better than bubble but I have not found it. The most similar word would be effervescence but that's slightly ...
Ed3D's user avatar
  • 21
4 votes
1 answer
281 views

Definition of amino acid side chain

Is the α-carbon considered a part of amino acid side chain? Is the nitrogen atom on the backbone is considered a part of the side chain of the proline?
William Wong's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
130 views

Degree of polymerization with structure-based polymer naming

Polymers may be named using either a structure-based or a source-based nomenclature, as detailed in the IUPAC Purple Book.[1] Therefore, the polymer descibed by $\require{enclose}\ce{\enclose{...
Snijderfrey's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
798 views

Name of particles in a suspension

What is the proper name given to the particles in a suspension? Suspensae perhaps? When these particles are brought out of suspension, and precipitate down to the bottom of the mixture, what is that ...
hotmeatballsoup's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
322 views

Should chemical names in figures be capitalised? [duplicate]

If I draw a molecule (for example glucose) and I want to name it, should I write glucose or Glucose? My aim is to draw a molecule, add the name below and then use this as a figure in a Word text.
Mégas Aléxandros's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
4k views

Why does almost every drug that causes dependence have this "-ine" suffix?

I noticed that many drugs that cause dependence have the suffix word "-ine". For example: Caffeine, nicotine, benzodiazepine, methamphetamine, cocaine, and morphine. My questions: Why do ...
reinardhz's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
58 views

What is reversible change for ideal gas?

What are the reversible and irreversible changes for an ideal gas? Is it the change that keeps the ideal gas law during the change? Is any reversible change a sum of changes satisfying the ideal gas ...
Jihyun's user avatar
  • 149
-1 votes
2 answers
145 views

Can you coat/ "plate" things with non metals or compounds? [closed]

I was recently watching a video on electro plating I understand that it only works with metals so I wondered if there's a method to do the same thing but with non-metals.
neo flare's user avatar
  • 109
1 vote
1 answer
137 views

What is the meaning of a “halide component” for Friedel–Crafts reaction? [closed]

Among the given halides, which one can be used as halide component for Friedel–Crafts reaction? (a) Isopropyl chloride (b) Bromobenzene (c) Chlorobenzene (d) Chloroethene I don't understand what a &...
HarshDarji's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
272 views

Is there a canonical variable for period and group?

For example, "Z" is the standard symbol for atomic number. I'm writing a manuscript that uses the group and period of elements within some equations, and so far I'm just denoting them as $G_{...
AmphotericLewisAcid's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

How is relative interaction energy defined and quantified?

I understand the interaction energy is the energy associated or caused by the interaction between the objects. So, for atoms it has to be the sum of van der Waals interaction and Coulomb interaction. ...
Roshan Shrestha's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
70 views

What does “efficiency” refer to for a refrigerator?

A problem from my textbook mentions a refrigerator working with $35\,\%$ efficiency. I thought that in this case the coefficient of performance (COP) was used, specifically $Q_\mathrm{cold}/W,$ which ...
jack gatz's user avatar

1
2 3 4 5
11