Questions tagged [solutions]

This tag should be applied to questions dealing with solutions of any kind. A solution is a liquid or solid phase containing more than one substance where, for convenience, one (or more) substance(s) called the solvent is treated differently from the other substances, which are called solutes. If water is the solvent, then the more appropriate 'aqueous-solution' tag should (also) be specified.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4
votes
1answer
144 views

Liquid that does not spoil for a mineral aquarium

I want to create a decoration - a mason jar "aquarium". I want to take a large mason jar, put some nice mineral specimens in it, fill the jar with liquid and seal it with lid. I believe I can't use ...
4
votes
3answers
22k views

How to determine the mole fraction of the liquid phase from a given mole fraction of the vapour phase for a benzene/toluene mixture?

A quantity of benzene, $\ce{C6H6}$, and toluene, $\ce{C6H5CH3}$, is placed in a $\pu{1 L}$ evacuated vessel at $\pu{25 ^\circ C}$. At equilibrium, a small volume of liquid is visible at the bottom of ...
4
votes
1answer
45 views

Kinetics of air evolving from water on heating

Is there a simple relationship describing the kinetics of air evolving from water on heating? For example, if I let water at room temperature and pressure saturate with air, it should have some ...
4
votes
1answer
290 views

Making a non-CN dissolved gold solution ideal for electroplating

I've had success electroplating $\ce{Ni}$ and $\ce{Cu}$, but interestingly never $\ce{Al}$. My focus here is on plating with $\ce{Au}$, specifically onto an $\ce{Ni}$ surface. In general from my own ...
4
votes
0answers
55 views

Is there an adhesive that is not dissolved by acetone?

I am trying to glue glass sheets together to make a sealed 13" x 13" x 13" box. Inside this box there would be acetone gas used to melt 3D printed parts to make them more durable. Acetone will remove ...
4
votes
0answers
23 views

Is there a concise notation for a solution of one substance in another? [closed]

I'm aware of phase notation of $\ce{(aq)}$ for aqueous solutions. Is there something similar for solutions of chemical X dissolved in chemical Y?
4
votes
0answers
502 views

Theory of volume contraction in solution

When a solid is dissolved into a liquid, or two solids are amalgamated, their mutual volume will contract. For example, a crystal of sugar having a volume of one cubic inch dissolved into 10 cubic ...
4
votes
0answers
234 views

Debye-Huckel theory with non-polar solvents

I want to calculate the activity coefficients of mixed solvent salt solutions. I am seeing very strange behavior when I try calculating the activity coefficient of salts in non-polar solvents using ...
4
votes
0answers
100 views

Synthesizing monodisperse PbS quantum dots

For a research project, I am trying to synthesize lead (II) sulfide quantum dots using the method of Li et al.. I am injecting sulfur dissolved in 1-octadecene into a mixture of $\ce{PbO}$, oleic ...
4
votes
0answers
162 views

How do xanthan gum and other hydrocolloids work?

Does anyone know what causes things like xanthan gum to make water into a slimy substance on the molecular level?
4
votes
1answer
86 views

In the nonideal solution, why can't one of the solute be positive deviation and the other be negative deviation?

In the nonideal solution, why can't one of the solute be positive deviation and the other be negative deviation? Let's say A and B makes a nonideal solution. The moleculat force between A and B means ...
3
votes
2answers
14k views

Why do ionic substances with higher lattice energies tend to be less soluble in water than substances with lower lattice energies?

I understand that that energy is required to overcome intermolecular forces holding solute particles together in the crystal, but I don't understand how this relates to lattice energies and respective ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What does (sol) in a chemical equation mean?

I'm reading Shrivers Inorganic Chemistry book and some of the equations have a (sol) state on them. I'm sure the book has already defined this but I cannot find where. Examples: \begin{align} \ce{[...
3
votes
2answers
822 views

When making a calibration curve, do we have to use the wavelength at maximum absorbance?

If you are making a calibration curve for $\ce{CuSO4}$ where you plot absorbance against concentration, does the wavelength have to be exactly at the maximum of the peak? Or can it be somewhere else ...
3
votes
2answers
6k views

Is sodium acetate strong or a weak electrolyte?

Since it is formed of a strong base and a weak acid it should be a strong electrolyte but a chemistry teacher said that it is a weak electrolyte.....
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Why do colligative properties depend only on number of solute particles?

Colligative properties depend solely on the number of even though the interactive forces are different for different solute-solvent pairs. So why is the dependence only on the number of solute?
3
votes
2answers
432 views

Is HDPE affected by long term exposure to methanol?

For at least several years I'be been storing various chloride solutions with methanol as a solute in Nalgene containers, which I believe are made from high density polyethylene (HDP). But recently ...
3
votes
3answers
7k views

How to determine electrolyte concentration in solutions?

The original question is here We've been given the sports drink vs orange juice challenge. To find out which has more electrolytes. I could test for conductivity but that alone wouldn't tell me ...
3
votes
1answer
808 views

Solution to Raoult's Law for a volatile binary solution (no pun intended)

Raoult's Law In a closed container, $$P_A=P_A^\circ x_A$$ where $P_A$ is the pressure of compound in gaseous phase, and $x_A$ is the mole fraction of the liquid component A in the liquid mixture. If ...
3
votes
1answer
124 views

Adding ethanol to louche

I'm watching MIT chemistry by Donald Sadoway. In one of his lectures devoted to solutions and phase separation, he performs experiments with absinthe. First he mixes absinthe with 5 $\times$ water ...
3
votes
2answers
855 views

Interpretation of miscibility curves

I stumbled across miscibility curves in the section Solubility of Liquids in Liquids (Organic Chemistry, by Wallwork and Grant) today. I'm not sure if my problem is with the way the content was laid ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Mass of salt required to make a 1.2 g/ml solution

I would like to make an NaCl and water solution with a density of 1.2 g/ml. How would you calculate the grams of NaCl required to make a 1000 ml solution? I have used density of mixture = (mass NaCl +...
3
votes
1answer
14k views

Why does ethanol and water mixture show positive deviation from Raoult's Law?

So, my teacher said, "For a solution to show positive deviation from Raoult's Law, it must have a compound which is lacking hydrogen bond and a compound which has hydrogen bond." This is because the ...
3
votes
2answers
623 views

Colligative properties and sizes of particles

Why do colligative properties only depend on the number of particles and not the size? *My argument being that since the root cause of these properties is the occurrence of solute particles on the ...
3
votes
2answers
79 views

Understanding what is happening when something is dissovled

Let's start with a saturated solution of NaCl in water. At this point, any further addition of NaCl at the same T and P would not dissolve. However, if I then add another fully soluble salt (say AgNO3)...
3
votes
2answers
396 views

Dissolving in DMSO semantics

What does it mean when a substance (powder) is 'dissolved in DMSO and used at $\mathrm{5~\%}$' Does is mean that the substance is first dissolved in DMSO and then added to another solution where it ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Can dissolving be a chemical change?

My textbook says that $\ce{SO2}$ dissolving in water produces sulfurous acid, but that seems to be a chemical change. But $\ce{NaCl}$ dissolving in water is not a chemical change. Please explain.
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Acidic and alkaline salt solutions: why do some salt form acid/bases while others don't [closed]

I have a question regarding salts and their solutions. How come some salts, like sodium carbonate and ammonium chloride, produce acids/bases when dissolved in water? Moreover, how can you predict ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the procedure to create stock solutions?

Until now to execute this recipe, each time i had to count those milligrams/Liter. An enough difficult procedure. I am posting here this question to help me understand the procedure of creating ...
3
votes
1answer
445 views

Relation between freezing point depression and vapor pressure

My lab manual defines the freezing point as "The temperature at which the vapor pressure of the substance in its liquid phase is equal to its vapor pressure in the solid phase." It goes on to explain ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Proof of Dynamic Nature of Equilibrium

Here is how my textbook proves that dissolution of solid in liquid is dynamic in nature. It considers the example of a saturated solution of sugar. It says that, Though the solution is in ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

Differences between miscible and soluble

What are the differences between soluble and miscible? So far I found this (page 3 http://faculty.sites.uci.edu/chem1l/files/2011/03/D01MANmiscibility.pdf): soluble=solid dissolves into a liquid ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

Does NaCl reduce the surface tension of water?

Does NaCl reduce the surface tension of water? And why? For example soap does it, and I was wondering if NaCl does the same.
3
votes
2answers
8k views

About pH of an aqueous solution of SO2

Probably we can have an aqueous solution of $\ce{SO2}$ by dissolving it in water, because we would have an equilibrium between $\ce{SO2(g)}$ and $\ce{SO2(aq)}$: $$\ce{SO2(g) <=> SO2(aq)}$$ How ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Computer killed by insecticide; what compounds are likely?

A friend of mine sprayed "Black Flag Home Defense" insecticide under her computer. It died immediately. I'm trying to figure out why, and how fixable it might be. I found an MSDS, but it only says ...
3
votes
2answers
658 views

Mixing of powders to make stock solutions

For a solution such as: Luria-Bertani (LB) Broth: 10 g tryptone 5 g yeast extract 10 g of NaCl ($M = 58.44\ \mathrm{g/mol}$) q.s. to 1 l, pH to 7.2, autoclave. I would like to make a bulk amount ...
3
votes
1answer
113 views

Residual stress in polymer coatings

A paper talks about the residual stress when coating polymers. It says that residual stress is the sum of the "heat stress" (due to the difference in thermal expansion coefficients) and the "shrinkage ...
3
votes
1answer
798 views

Electric field effect on reactions

What would be the effect of putting a solution in a strong electric field? Would the reactions in the solution be affected? I'm thinking yes – lots (if not all) – chemistry is dependent on charge (...
3
votes
1answer
465 views

Conductance of the mixture of two solutions with given resistance values [duplicate]

If $R_1$ and $R_2$ are the resistances of two solutions of equal volume what is the conductance of the mixture in the same conductivity cell? In general, I grasped neither the approach, nor the ...
3
votes
1answer
109 views

Flaw in my logic on Henry's Law?

It states mathematically $ p=Kx $ where $x$ is mole fraction of dissolved gas and $p$ is partial pressure of the gas. Dissolution of gases is exothermic, so with increase in temperature, solubility $x$...
3
votes
1answer
981 views

Raoult's Law and Mole Fraction

Raoult's Law states that the partial vapor pressure of each component of an ideal mixture of liquids is equal to the vapor pressure of the pure component multiplied by its mole fraction in the mixture....
3
votes
1answer
288 views

Is a supersaturated solution still a solution?

Given that a solution must be a homogenous mixture, and having crystallized solids at the bottom of a solution is most definitely not homogenous, can a supersaturated solution still be technically ...
3
votes
2answers
10k views

Diluting acetic acid to obtain a solution of pH 5 [closed]

What percent of a solution needs to be acetic acid for a particular $\mathrm{pH}$? I have 100% acetic acid, and want $1~\mathrm{L}$ of solution with a $\mathrm{pH}$ of 5. I've done some research, but ...
3
votes
1answer
318 views

Solve this mole fraction calculation with incomplete information

I am currently trying to solve a problem that seems quite simple at the beginning but the complexity reveals itself soon thereafter. The problem is the following: You mix a known mass of water ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

What is hard and soft water and how does the process of dissolution work?

This is a very basic question about solubility, especially solution of table salt in water and solution of sugar in water. I have heard about terms like hard water, soft water, filtering of water to ...
3
votes
1answer
230 views

Why do acids usually completely react with bases?

When a neutralisation reaction happens, for example, $ \pu{100 mol l^-1}$ of $\ce{HCl}$ with $\pu{100 mol l^-1}$ $\ce{NH_3}$, why does all of the base and acid get converted to salt? Why isn't there ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Permanent suspension of cocoa powder into water

I have failed in permanently suspending cocoa powder into water. I have tried heat (212'f) and pressure (40 psi) into a sugar water solution (50/50). Also, powdered milk and evaporated milk have ...
3
votes
1answer
376 views

Condition for formation of azeotropes

Consider a binary azeotropic solution of two volatile components $A, B$. I wanted to try and find out the required concentrations of $A, B$ in the solution in terms of their vapour pressures. I tried ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

How do we turn PTFE powder into a paste we can dilute in a solvent

We want to create a binder we can use in our filter elements that is PTFE based, so we need to somehow create a paste, we can thin down with a solvent that will still hold the PTFE in suspension, long ...
3
votes
2answers
769 views

Why is partial pressure used as a metric for oxygen in blood?

I know haemoglobin basically acts as an oxygen buffer. But when we talk about non-bound oxygen in blood (or water), we're referring to the amount of O2 in solution (aqueous state). From a biochemistry ...

1 2 3
4
5
16