Questions tagged [reduction-potential]

For questions about the reduction potential (A measure of the tendency of a chemical species to acquire electrons and thereby be reduced) or its applications. Also see the tag [electrochemistry].

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Why is Cr²⁺ is a good reducing agent but Mn³⁺ is a good oxidising agent? [duplicate]

The question is the same as the title states. In my textbook,[NCERT Chemistry I for Class 12 , pg no 217.] the following is written $\ce{Cr^{2+}}$ gets converted to $\ce{Cr^{3+}}$ as the +3 oxidation ...
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1answer
9k views

Principle of potentiometric titration

In potentiometric titration between ascorbic acid and iodine, when we plot the graph of EMF with volume of iodine consumed, we get a sudden decrease in EMF at equivalance point--why? It is also ...
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1answer
832 views

Iodometric titration of copper – standard electrode potentials

Upon inspection of the standard electrode potentials for the half reactions for both $\ce{Cu^2+}$/$\ce{Cu+}$ and $\ce{I2}$/$\ce{2I-}$, it becomes apparent it should be the iodide ions that act as the ...
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692 views

What is the meaning of electrode potential?

When we say that the electrode potential for $\ce{Co}^2$$^+$/$\ce{Co}$ is -0.28 V and $\ce{Cu}^2$$^+$/$\ce{Cu}$ +0.337 V, what is the physical meaning? Can you conceptually explain when two electrons ...
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1answer
392 views

Implicit dependence of reaction rate through reduction potential and activation energy

On one hand, the larger the reduction potential of a chemical reaction and the smaller its activation energy, the larger the reaction reaction. on the other hand the rate of a reaction depends on ...
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1answer
395 views

How to find the potential of a mixed Iron/ Cer solution?

Given the following half-reactions: \begin{align} \ce{Ce^{4+} + e^{−} &-> Ce^{3+}} & E° &= \pu{1.72 V}\\ \ce{Fe^{3+} + e^{−} &-> Fe^{2+}} & E° &= \pu{0.771 V}\\...
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1answer
550 views

The spontaneity of a redox reaction

Suppose we have a redox reaction and we want to see in what direction the reaction is spontaneous. We do this by comparing the standard reduction potentials of the sub-reactions available in the main ...
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1answer
774 views

On Spontaneity of the Redox Reactions

According to this Mc Graw-Hill link during a spontaneous redox reaction Gibbs Free Enthalpy must decrease and at the same time the change in the Gibbs Free Enthalpy is the maximum electric work that ...
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3answers
20k views

Why is standard reduction potential an intensive property?

My book says that Since the number of electrons lost must equal the number gained, the half-reactions must be multiplied by integers as necessary to achieve the balanced equation. However, the ...
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1answer
352 views

Intuitive understanding of standard electrode potential

I have read many books on standard electrode potential and they define the term in various ways but I just can’t seem to get an intuitive idea of it. $$\ce{Cu^2+ + 2e- <=> Cu}$$ Standard ...
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2answers
12k views

Why can we disregard stoichiometric coefficients when computing reduction potentials?

Example: A $Cd // Cr$ Galvanic cell has redox half reactions: $\ce{Cd^{2+} + 2e^- -> Cd}$ $E_{cell}$ = -0.4 $\ce{Cr^{3+} + 3e- -> Cr}$ $E_{cell}$ = -0.7 Balanced equation of reaction ...
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Derivation of relationship between Gibbs free energy and electrochemical cell potential

Why is $\Delta G = -nFE$? I don't understand what the motivation is behind this definition. Was it derived or just given? The textbook provides no justification for this equation. In fact, much of ...
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20k views

Electrolysis of aqueous copper (II) nitrate

There are two copper blocks sitting in the $\ce{Cu(NO3)2 (aq)}$ solution, a battery is attached onto both of them, providing enough energy to start the reaction. Since solid pieces of copper are ...
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2answers
2k views

Why do carbonates, oxides, and pure metals precipitate before metal sulfides?

Water tends to leach metals near the surface and deposit them deeper through precipitation in two layers. The upper layer is usually made of metal carbonates, oxides, and occasionally pure or native ...

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