Questions tagged [periodic-trends]

Trends which are observed in the properties of elements as you move along the periodic table in a given direction.

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What is the correct order of chemical reactivity in terms of oxidising property for the following elements: F, Cl, O, and N

This is a textbook question. I am confused as to which factors i should consider while sorting out these elements. If I take electron gain enthalpy, then Cl should be greater than F, but if i consider ...
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Why is periodicity seen in these certain properties?

I missed my lesson on periodicity so had to teach myself, and have always forgotten to ask my teacher to explain to me why these trends are seen, which, unfortunately, the textbooks don't. Density: ...
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161 views

Reconciling multiple inorganic properties for the purposes of learning these elements

How can I reconcile all of the chemical properties, physical properties and peculiar behaviour of metals in inorganic chemistry for the purposes of studying these systematically? It is very hard to ...
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Why does solubility of Carbonate salts of Alkali metals in water increase down the group?

Carbonate salts have a very large anion so hydration energy should dominate over lattice energy. Since hydration energy is inversely proportional to radius of ion, I would expect Lithium to release ...
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61 views

Why is ionization energy of indium less than gallium?

In group 13 we observe an irregular trend in ionization energy: B > Tl > Ga > Al > In. Gallium has a filled 3d subshell, but indium has a filled 4d and 3d subshell. Thus it should have more poor ...
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Is the magnitude of ionisation enthalpy and ionisation energy is same?

In my textbook it is written that ionisation energy and ionisation enthalpy are two different quantities. ionisation energy is the amount of energy provided to extract an electron from the outermost ...
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33 views

How ion size/electronegativity influences strength of an acid

My prof was explaining how we can use the structure of acids and bases to rationalize relative strengths (ie: acid X is stronger than acid Y because ...). He then went on to explain how when ...
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775 views

Ionisation energies of Carbon and Boron

The first ionisation energy of Carbon atom is greater than that of Boron atom whereas, the reverse is true for the second ionisation energy. In order to explain the above statement I considered the ...
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Abnormal ionisation energy trend: Group 13 and 14

I was going through some ionisation energy data, where I came across the following: Ionisation energy order for Group 13 and 14: B > Al ≈ Ga > In < Tl C > Si > Ge > Sn < Pb What could be the ...
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824 views

Random order of melting points of group 2 elements

Compare the melting points of $\ce{BeF2, MgF2, CaF2, SrF2, BaF2}$. Actual order is $\ce{ BeF2 > CaF2 > SrF2 > BaF2 > MgF2}$. I have worked out the following things while comparing ...
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946 views

Why magnesium has the lowest melting and boiling point in its group? [duplicate]

It is written in the third point ( shown in the picture) that presence of d orbitals results in stronger metallic bond. 1) We check the strength of metallic bonding to compare the melting and boiling ...
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Why does electronegativity generally increase across a period? [duplicate]

I've been doing some research and the only answer I seem to be getting is that the increase of protons means electrons are more attracted to the atom. I thought though it was because as you go ...
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How does increasing the molecular mass of compounds of homologous series affect solubility?

First of all, I know that increasing the molecular mass decreases the solubility of that compound wrt, of another compound of the homologous series in organic chemistry. My question is how? My text ...
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Acidity/basicity of oxides across the periodic table [duplicate]

Recently while self-studying my chemistry book, it dawned on me that metals form basic oxides and nonmetals forma acidic oxides. Why is this?
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Why is the first energy of ionization of oxygen lesser than that of nitrogen? [duplicate]

The following question arises from a question I found in my book. Experimentally it has been determined that the value of the first energy of ionization of oxygen is lesser than the first energy ...
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593 views

why lithium is less reactive than sodium? [duplicate]

Lithium lies above sodium in a group and is also smaller in size. According to periodic trend reactivity decreases from left to right in period and down the group.
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If Mg(OH)2 is insoluble, why does the reaction of MgO and water produce a slightly alkali solution? [closed]

The equation of the reaction is: Mg(OH)2 + H2O -> Mg(OH)2. Why is it that this reaction produces a solution of around pH 9? There are no OH- ions produced.
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Why is phosphorus trifluoride the strongest Lewis acid among the phosphorus trihalides?

I had read that for the trihalides of boron, boron trifluoride is the weakest Lewis acid due to backbonding. The order I had seen was - $\ce{BI3 > BBr3 > BCl3 > BF3}\$ $$\ce{}$ $- order of ...
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261 views

Atomic radii and why does it decrease in a period [closed]

Why do atomic radii decreases as you move from left to right across a period
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357 views

Which is more metallic: boron or silicon?

I read somewhere that boron is more metallic. Is it correct? If so, can you please elaborate? The reason why I'm confused is because 2 factors come into play here: When you move towards right, ...
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Difference between Oxidation Potential and Ionization Potential [closed]

Ionization potential indicates a substance's tendency to loose electron and become a positive ion. So, a substance becomes ion more easily if it has a lower ionization potential (lower energy needed ...
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3answers
225 views

Is acidic character related to reducing power?

My book says that the acidic character of halogen acids increases on going down the group because the bond strength decreases, making it easier to release the $\ce{H+}$. But I also know that $\ce{HI}$...
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Thermal stability order of NaF, MgF2 and AlF3

I came up with a question to arrange thermal stability order of $\ce{NaF}$, $\ce{MgF2}$ and $\ce{AlF3}$ and I think the answer is $\ce{NaF>MgF2>AlF3}$ because $\ce{Na+}$ has largest ionic radius ...
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241 views

Relationship between effective nuclear load and periodic properties

The effective nuclear charge is defined as the net positive charge experienced by an electron in a polyelectronic atom. It can be calculated using the well-known Stars Rule. Once I have calculated ...
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why is lithium oxide so different from water [closed]

Take water and replace hydrogens with the next element down in the periodic table, and you get a white solid, nothing like water. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_oxide Lithium itself is very ...
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why are mercury gas and tungsten filament used in electric bulbs instead of fluorine which has higher electron affinity?

Fluorine has greater electron affinity than mercury or tungsten and hence fluorine could have been in electric bulbs.Because it can attract electrons easily than the metals which mostly repel extra ...
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Change in electronegativity order down a group from groups 13-16 to group 17

In general, going down a group Zeff initially increases but then becomes approximately constant, while electrons are in higher n orbitals, hence valence electrons on average further from nucleus, ...
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107 views

Quickly deduce block (s, p, d …) from atomic number [closed]

A question from previous year papers of IIT JEE. There's not enough time to write the electronic configuration in the exam. Please suggest a quick, objective approach.
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Why is caesium considered the most reactive element and not fluorine? [closed]

Some people say caesium is most reactive element. I thought it to be fluorine as it is the element that reacts with almost all elements (except couple of inert gases). But caesium won't react many of ...
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1answer
935 views

Why it the electron affinity of beryllium is greater than nitrogen? [closed]

As we know that fully filled electronic configuration is more stable than half filled electronic configuration, so in my opinion beryllium's electron affinity should be less than nitrogen's. Is my ...
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810 views

About ionic bonds (and ionic compounds) [closed]

I have a few questions: All ionic bond occurs between a metal and a non-metal. Is this true? In the definition of metal and/or non-metal are the metaloids included? In the definition of non-metal are ...
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Trends in ionization energy in the second period [closed]

Question Which element among the following has the highest ionisation energy: fluorine, oxygen, neon. I know that all these elements belong to period 2 and ionisation energy increases from left ...
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Which is the most reactive element in the periodic table? [duplicate]

Which is the most reactive element in the periodic table? Is it francium, caesium, lithium or fluorine?

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