Questions tagged [metal]

For questions about metals in general and their physical or chemical properties. For characteristic properties and reactions of d and f block metals specifically, use the [transition-metals] and [rare-earth-elements] tags respectively instead.

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32 views

In Na extraction, is Ca2+ of CaCl2 reduced in addition to Na+ of NaCl in electrolysis

In Na extraction from $\ce{NaCl}$, $\ce{CaCl2}$ is added in electrolysis to lower the melting point of the mixture to about $\pu{750 ^\circ C}$. But doesn't $\ce{Ca^2+}$ cation compete with the $\ce{...
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Are metallic character and electropositivity the same thing?

The definition of metallic character is how easily an element can lose valence electrons in a reaction, which is the same thing as electropositivity. Yet my textbook says ionization energy is the best ...
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1answer
255 views

Do we have some “rule of thumb” to estimate the miscibility of metals?

For example, for ordinary fluids, we have polar and apolar ones. The "rule of thumb" is that polar fluids mix with each other, and also apolar fluids mix with each other, but polar fluids ...
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25 views

Relating to density trend of alkali metals

Why is the density of potassium less than that of sodium? And why doesn't it follow the trend of increasing density down the group?
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1answer
122 views

Does there exist a black coloured metal?

Most of the metals are just painted/coated black. Does there exist a black coloured metal, either natural or artificial, such that even when we scratch it, it will still remain black?
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1answer
38 views

Is it possible to manipulate some specific atoms of a liquid metal by dint of the magnetic field, electric field, etc?

Let's deem, we have a liquid metal that is multicomponent, for example, type A, B, and C. Is it possible that we single out the type A and put them in a specific shape, for example, a circle? Let me ...
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3answers
4k views

How toxic chemically is plutonium (Pu), neglecting the radioactive damage?

In Rhodes' The Making of the Atomic Bomb, he says that, while Pu is not that radioactive (which is surprising -- maybe he means compared with radium and some other elements), it is very toxic. I would ...
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How does free gadolinium work?

What happens to free gadolinium ion in the environment? I received an MRI with contrast for the brain and now I am curious as to what happens to gadolinium once it leaves the body. Eventually it will ...
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Can metal matrix composites be alloyed after their creation?

I've done a little research on metal matrix composites (MMCs), purely for fun and out of interest. Different types of metal powders are combined with reinforcement materials, to produce a reinforced ...
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29 views

Will a dangerous amount of lead leach into soil from a galvanised corrugated steel raised bed? [closed]

I have searched, found similar questions but none answer my specific need. I have built a raised garden bed to grow vegetables (ironically due to a high lead content in our garden soil - planning to ...
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2answers
32 views

If acid releases proton then how can a proton react with another proton to form hydrogen gas? [duplicate]

As we know that acid releases proton (H+ ion) when dipped in water hydrogen has a proton and electron only . To form H+ hydrogen releases 1 electron and it becomes proton. But when Acid reacts with ...
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1answer
76 views

The dissociation of hydrogen on UO2 and PuO2 surfaces: Homolytic or heterolytic?

I have seen that $\ce{H2}$ can dissociate on a metal-oxide surface by two methods: Heterolytically, forming a proton-$\ce{O}$ bond ($\ce{OH}$ group) and a hydride-metal bond ($\ce{M-H}$) on a metal-...
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Why is Na+ reduced instead of H+ in the electrolysis of dilute NaCl(aq) with Mercury cathode?

In a class of electrolysis, my instructor told me that Hg forms Na-Hg in the electrolysis of dilute NaCl aqueous solution. For this reason, sodium cations are reduced in the cathode instead of ...
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39 views

Do all metals expand on heating? [duplicate]

This question came up when I was reading about substances with negative thermal expansion. The article by Takenaka [1] gives a good list of materials displaying negative thermal expansion. I noticed ...
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2answers
85 views

Copper acetate solution turning clear

I made a solution of copper acetate using 5% Acetic acid 3%hydrogen peroxide and copper wire and copper pipe and it had produced a blue solution of copper acetate. I left it over night to continue ...
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1answer
38 views

What makes metals malleable and ductile? [closed]

Two well-known Physical Properties of metals is that they are malleable and dutile I was just wondering about what causes metals to be malleable and/or ductile and non-metals to be brittle? What ...
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2answers
99 views

Do all metal salts in aqueous solution contain metal aquo complexes?

I know that nickel nitrate in aqueous solution contains the metal aquo complex ion $\ce{[Ni(H2O)6]^2+}$. But do all metal salts in aqueous solution contain such complex ions? If not, on what factors ...
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1answer
32 views

Are inner transition metals also part of the transition group? [closed]

My book doesn't say anything about this and leaves it ambiguous. The periodic table they gave colored the inner transition metals as "transition metals". So, are inner transition metals also part of ...
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4answers
503 views

If you placed silver metal into silver nitrate, would a reaction occur? [closed]

thinking about oxidation and reduction, what happens to the silver metal and the silver ions?
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3answers
623 views

Which is the most reactive metal: Caesium or Francium? [duplicate]

I searched on Wikipedia for reactivity series but it showed me Caesium as the most reactive metal. I know and have studied that reactivity increases as we go down the first group. Then shouldn’t it be ...
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44 views

Importance of concentration of gold in gold parting

I read following lines about gold parting: Gold is not attacked by $\ce{H2SO4}$ or $\ce{HNO3}$, but copper and silver dissolve in them, when concentration of gold is less than $30\%$. If however, ...
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2answers
61 views

Identifying Copper Purity At Home [closed]

Are there any ways to figure out if the copper foil and mesh I have are pure, as-close-to 100% copper as possible (and as advertised)?
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359 views

Will galvanic corrosion happen on a ring made of gold and bronze?

I have recently got a custom-made ring from a jeweler. It’s made from a byzantine-period bronze ring enveloped in a gold bangle. The bronze ring is “glued” onto the gold ring through some kind of ...
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Is strontium more metallic than sodium? If yes then why?

I got an MCQ in my examination, "Which one of the following is more metallic?" and the options were Sr, Na, Be or Aluminium. I know that sodium is more metallic than Be or Al but my mind stuck on ...
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3answers
901 views

Do metals form covalent bonds besides ionic and cordinate bond? [closed]

My chemistry textbook says that metals form ionic or cordinate bonds whereas non metals form covalent bonds. But in another textbook I read that Lithium, Beryllium, Aluminium, Chromium, Manganese etc, ...
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1answer
81 views

How can sodium be reduced in the Castner–Kellner process?

In the Castner–Kellner process, why is sodium amalgam formed instead of hydrogen gas at the cathode? If we electrolyse brine solution, then it will liberate hydrogen at cathode, not sodium, because $\...
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1answer
137 views

How is red oxide of copper converted into black oxide & vice versa? [closed]

I can't really find any information about it. Any help would be appreciated.
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1answer
66 views

Surface energy for different crystallographic planes

For a given crystal structure, say body centred cubic, on what factors does surface energy of each plane depend? A basic approach considers the atomic density on each crystallographic plane, the ...
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Black substances covering Aluminum Electrode

I have use two aluminum pieces as electrodes to electrolys salt (NaCl) water. After the experiment, I found that wherever electricity flows, the electrode will be covered in some blackish substances. ...
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2answers
30 views

What can I use to remove print from hard surfaces?

I have a lot of profile products with the logotype of the company handing them out printed on them. In some situations I don't like to show these logos. However, it is stupid to bin working products ...
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1answer
293 views

Does pure iron not rust?

In my school science textbook, written more than twenty years ago, it said that pure iron does not rust. Accompanying was a photograph of an ancient iron statue situated outside, which had not rusted. ...
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1answer
75 views

Why does the rusting process start from the bent/squeezed portion of iron?

I have noticed that the rusting of iron starts from the squeezed or bent parts of iron piece. I want to know what is the peculiar reason for the observation that rusting starts from bent or irregular ...
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23 views

Is fluorinated steel corrosion resistant from normal oxidation?

I've recently learned of a compound named Chlorine trifluoride a powerful fluorinating agent. The common way to store it seems to be in regular steel drums where it flash oxidizes the inside of the ...
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1answer
176 views

Need of refining aluminium and Hoope vs Hall–Héroult processes

Recently I was taught how aluminium is commercially extracted. The ore is first concentrated by leaching either by Bayer's process for red bauxite (impurity: $\ce{Fe2O3}$) or by Serpeck's process for ...
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1answer
43 views

Why is the cathode of a lithium-ion battery metallic, which is the opposite of most other batteries? [closed]

In most types of batteries, primary and secondary, the metallic electrode is the anode, and a non-metal acts as cathode. Or a pure metal is the anode, and the cathode is a metal oxide. Why is the ...
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1answer
245 views

Aluminium Oxide as Dehydrating agent

According to this paper on dehydration by $\ce{Al2O3}$, Dehydroxylation causes a surface defects as Lewis acidic centers (unsaturated $\ce{Al^3+}$ ions) and basic Lewis centers ($\ce{O^2-}$ ions) ...
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26 views

Dissolving plastic resin without damaging aluminium surface

I have an aluminium surface covered with some plastic, which I intend to dissolve in order to clean the surface. On the note for the plastic I have applied, it says that it contains the following: 2-...
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3answers
223 views

Obtaining mercury from mercury(II) nitrate

I was thinking about obtaining mercury from mercury(II) nitrate. Is it possible? I've tried putting chunks of Fe into it, I've got the logic from the voltaic table (where Fe is on the left side of Hg, ...
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1answer
70 views

Why does the displacement reaction of zinc in copper(II) sulfate solution result in dark metallic copper?

It is commonly known that when zinc metal is placed in a solution of copper(II) sulfate, a displacement reaction occurs, and elemental copper is deposited onto the decomposing zinc metal. A practical ...
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1answer
55 views

Metal nail reaction in wall filler

Please help explain what is happening to this nail. It has been in this wall filler for a good few months. The substance being excreted was rising up forming these stalagmites, with a liquid forming ...
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1answer
56 views

Gallium makes aluminum soft like a wet tissue. Any other metals or alloys that are vulnerable to similar damage? [closed]

Gallium can make aluminum soft and brittle as long as it bypasses the aluminum oxide normally formed on the surface of the aluminum (for example by scratching the surface). Mercury can weaken ...
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31 views

Using MP-AES, can I accurately say I've found a metal concentration on one wavelength and not another?

I've been given the opportunity to use an MP-AES for metal detection. I'm testing traces of metals in plants. The plant matter is digested so I have a liquid solution, I expect there to be a lot of ...
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Diferent Sacrificial Anodes Duration

Zinc, magnesium and alluminium are the common anodes, there are all diferent. Ones more reactive than the other, which is why some are more effective in salt water. Salt water is a better conductor to ...
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83 views

What is the physical meaning of the statements like “weight percentage of FeO in Fe”? [closed]

I have always had the notion of calculating weight percentage of Fe in FeO. It always seems that we are to calculate at times the weight percentage of FeO in Fe.Particularly when one weight percentage ...
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663 views

Is it safe to boil water in a foil pan on an electric burner?

Is it safe to boil water in a foil pan on an electric burner? Can the metal leach into the water? I've heard some reports recently about avoiding aluminum foil due to it leaching into food. Photos ...
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1answer
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However what is so acidic about CaO and basic(no pun intended) about SiO2 while calculating basicity of slag?

I have seen Basicity to be calculated as $\mathrm{B} = wt\%\:\ce{CaO}/wt\%\:\ce{SiO2}$ particularly in slag bascity/acidity calcuations. Now I do not think that $\ce{CaO}$ is the most basic oxide that ...
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1answer
106 views

Why do we use coke instead of coal in order to reduce FeO as basic reaction in ironmaking process?

Why is coke used as a reducing agent to reduce FeO to produce iron instead of coal.I admit that coke is carbonaceous but what is it that compels us to use coke instead of the naturally available coal?
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489 views

Gold Plating on Glass?

I am considering labware options to handle NaOH solutions at ~150°C. One appealing idea would be to coat my current glassware with gold. I've read different sources mentioning the possibility without ...
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88 views

The phlogiston theory [closed]

I have looked this theory up on google and found that the theory is that when metal is burnt calx (metal oxide) and phlogiston is created (metal --> calx + phlogiston). Then I found out that ...
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2answers
1k views

What is the most convenient way to prepare ferrous oxide (FeO) in the laboratory?

The Wikipedia page for ferrous oxide states that $\ce{FeO}$ can be prepared by the thermal decomposition of iron(II) oxalate, with the following reaction: $$\ce{FeC2O4 → FeO + CO2 + CO}$$ And that ...

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