Questions tagged [ionic-compounds]

Compounds in which at least some of bonds have ionic character stronger than covalent or metallic. Many compounds called salts are ionic compounds but not all of them.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
9
votes
1answer
7k views

What is Sodium Chloride like in gas state?

Since sodium chloride is sodium and chlorine atoms bonded as a lattice and there are no discrete molecules, doesn't that mean in gas state, sodium chloride is simply sodium and chlorine atoms separate ...
13
votes
4answers
8k views

Why is CaCl2 called calcium chloride?

Doing a first year chem class. Just read through the molecular naming of compounds and now I'm confused as to why $\ce{CaCl2}$ is called calcium chloride and not calcium dichloride?
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Chemical bonding - lattice energy

Question: Why is ionic lattice energy inversely proportional to the radius of the atom? Most heterogeneous covalent molecules are polar to some extent. The degree of polarity, or the dipole moment, ...
1
vote
1answer
6k views

Why is Aluminium Chloride a Lewis Acid if it's an ionic compound?

In my textbook it says in the reaction $\ce{AlCl3 + Cl- -> AlCl4-}$, Aluminium Chloride ($\ce{AlCl3}$) has six valence electrons and accepts a lone pair from $\ce{Cl-}$, but wouldn't that mean the ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Solvent for copper(I) iodide, copper(I) thiocyanate, silver iodide for HTM deposition; safety for methylammonium lead iodide

I'm a student working in a high school laboratory that is looking to pursue research into perovskite cells for next year, but I have some solubility and safety questions. What would be a good solvent ...
31
votes
7answers
104k views

Are metallic/ionic bonds weaker than covalent bonds?

In mineralogy class, I was taught that metallic and ionic bonds are weaker than covalent bonds and that's why quartz and diamond have such a high hardness value. However, in organic chemistry class, I ...
0
votes
2answers
13k views

Chemical Equation: Sulfuric acid and powdered sodium carbonate

I was asked to write a balanced chemical equation for the reaction between sulfuric acid and sodium carbonate. The balanced equation isn't the problem. The question asks to also show all the state ...
5
votes
2answers
19k views

Find the pH of a sodium chloride solution using the extended Debye-Huckel equation

Question Use activities to calculate the pH of each of the following solutions, being sure to use $\mathrm{\alpha}$ values and the extended Debye-Huckel equation. The first one the ...
2
votes
1answer
29k views

Why does NaCl dissolve in H2O despite its strong ionic bond? [duplicate]

If $\ce{NaCl}$ is such a strongly bonded ionic compound, why it does it disassociate so readily in $\ce{H2O}$? One would think that because of the very strong ionic bond it would not disassociate it ...
8
votes
3answers
15k views

The Crisscross method for finding the chemical formula

I am reading this wikipedia article that I don't understand. What I don't understand is: suppose we have two elements $X$ and $Y$ having oxidation numbers $x$ and $y$ respectively. Can we prove ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Can a organic compounds such as hydrocarbons contain an ionic bond?

Can organic compounds like hydrocarbons have types of bonds other than covalent bonds? Can they also possess ionic bonds?
4
votes
3answers
12k views

Can an organic compound have an ionic bond?

Is there any organic compound that has another type of bond other than the covalent bond?
2
votes
1answer
3k views

How would one compare the magnitude of covalent character between SnCl4 and SnF2 using Fajan's Rules?

It is easy to compare two ionic compounds when one of the ions is same. However, how do we compare two compounds if one of the ions is the same element but just has different charge and the other ion ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Ionic Strength of 0.1M of HEPES?

HEPES, the buffer, has the chemical formula $\ce{C8H18N2O4S}$. Using the Ionic Strength formula from Wikipedia. I have calculated that $0.1M$ of HEPES would have a strength of $1.7M$, would it be ...
12
votes
2answers
8k views

Is pyrite (FeS₂) an ionic or a covalent compound?

I have searched all over the web and found a lot of diverse explanations, but none of them are concluding exactly whether $\ce{FeS2}$ (solid - pyrite) is a covalent or an ionic compound. From ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

Is melting of NaCl a physical and chemical process?

If I melt $\ce{NaCl}$, I get a molten salt. This means a liquid formed only by ions ($\ce{Cl^-}$ and $\ce{ Na^+}$). That could mean that the crystal $\ce{NaCl}$ experimented a chemical change: $$\ce{ ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Reaction between zinc and sulfur

Would the reaction between zinc and sulfur be $$\ce{Zn_{(s)} + S_{(s)} -> ZnS_{(s)}}$$ or $$\ce{8 Zn_{(s)} + S_8\ _{(s)} -> 8ZnS_{(s)}}$$ I know that $\ce{S}$ and $\ce{S8}$ are allotropes of ...
6
votes
2answers
39k views

Are ionic bonds stronger than covalent bonds?

A covalent bond involves overlapping of orbitals while an Ionic bond involves charge separation. Why are bonds formed by the overlapping of orbitals weaker than charge separation; why is an ionic ...
4
votes
1answer
258 views

Can polyatomic ions (CO₃, PO₄, SO₄, NO₃) be considered conjugated systems?

From my perspective these resonance structures allow these specific polyatomic ions to act as donor-acceptor molecules. Many donor-acceptor molecules also tend to be conjugated systems because they ...
2
votes
2answers
6k views

Why are cations ordinarily smaller than anions?

I'm reading on ionic crystal structures and am confused by this from my textbook: Because the metallic elements give up electrons when ionized, cations are ordinarily smaller than anions I ...
6
votes
5answers
7k views

Epsom salts - heavy metal contamination myth?

This recipe for home-made handwash (liquid soap) consists of bar soap, water, Epsom salts, and coconut oil. The author specifically warns against using 'artificial' Epsom salts, preferring the ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Ionic or covalent bond

Which bond is stronger, ionic or covalent? I have a lot of confusion about this.
3
votes
2answers
817 views

How to identify ionic compounds

I have a Chemistry lab in which I must design and carry out an experiment to determine the compound in each of eight numbered vials. Each vial contains one of these ionic compounds: BaCl2 CaCO3 Ca(OH)...
8
votes
2answers
7k views

Why do ionic compounds dissociate whereas coordinate complexes won't?

An ionic bond is the bonding between a non-metal and a metal, that occurs when charged atoms (ions) attract after one loses one or more of its electrons,and gives it to the other molecule, for example ...
4
votes
4answers
5k views

Why is zinc deposited on copper when boiling an aqueous zinc sulfate solution?

I did an experiment where I dissolved 30 grams of zinc sulfate in water and boiled it with strips of solid zinc metal and strips of copper metal and a layer of zinc was deposited on the copper. I ...
6
votes
1answer
213 views

How did Halogens become known as Halogens? They are not the only elements that form salts!

Having never given it a though before, I recently discovered (in a different context) that the prefix halo- actually means 'salt' or 'sea' and the suffix -gen means 'to form' or 'to generate'. So the ...
1
vote
1answer
126 views

What does “/2” in the structure of calcium benzoate mean?

Please see the following figure. This is from the high school chemistry book of my son. He wants to know what does that /2 after $\ce{-COOCa}$ mean. The book is a non English one. And I have changed ...
3
votes
2answers
179 views

Would dissolving a salt and letting it sit for 48 hours have an effect on the solution?

If one were to dissolve magnesium citrate (about $100~\mathrm{mg}$) in water (about $70~\mathrm{ml}$) and let the solution sit for 48 hours, would the solution be exactly the same as one dissolved and ...
2
votes
2answers
389 views

How are pure substances (elements, compounds, etc) produced? [closed]

How are large quantities of the substances we use in the lab generally produced? (As in the process from getting the stuff out of the ground to use in the lab) How 'pure' are they? Also: is it ...
10
votes
4answers
108k views

Is melting/boiling point of ionically bonded substance higher than of covalently bound?

Is the melting and boiling point of ionic bond usually higher than covalent bond? I know that compounds with ionic bonds are usually solid at room temperature, so I want other answers than this. (...
2
votes
1answer
161 views

How to solve this contradiction?

I am getting confused about this the more problems I do on it. My understanding was that only strong acids and strong bases will react to produce water and a salt. Something like this: Molecular Eq: $\...
2
votes
2answers
6k views

How many valence electrons does the azide ion have?

We had a test and and we had a question asking the number of valence electrons in an azide ion, $\ce{N3^{-}}$. I find out that the answer is 16 but I could not understand how. I saw the structure. ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Is there a word for a compound that has both ionic and covalent bonds?

For example, calcium carbide (CaC$_2$) has covalent C‒C bonds and ionic Ca$^{2+}$‒ C$_2^{2-}$ bonds.
8
votes
3answers
11k views

Chemically removing rust without leaving any unwanted residues

I have this iron pan that got rusty from not being properly dried. Scrubbing it I was able to get rid of most of the rust, but there's still some I just can't remove. I thought I could chemically ...
4
votes
1answer
8k views

How to rationalise the coordination number of CsCl versus NaCl?

Question: Suggest an explanation for the coordination number in the $\ce{CsCl}$ lattice being different from those in $\ce{NaCl}$. Standard answer: Caesium ion is larger than sodium ion, hence ...
-1
votes
2answers
580 views

Effect of light on ionic compounds

If I had an ionic molecule which needed $\pu{4 eV}$ to break the ionic bond, a $\pu{7 eV}$ photon is shot at it. If it is absorbed by the molecule and breaks, where does the rest of the energy go?
5
votes
2answers
22k views

If copper has 2 valance electrons and sulfur 6, why don't they bind in pairs?

Simple question, the average neutral copper atom has 2 valance electrons, and sulfur 6. Wouldn't the two electrons jump from copper and bind to sulfide? The empirical formula is: $\ce{Cu + S -> ...
20
votes
4answers
3k views

Will gaseous ionic compounds be free moving ions?

I knew while learning about electrolysis that if the ionic compound is molten it becomes free moving ions. If that is the case, what will happen if I continued heating till it reaches the boiling ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Good acid for cleaning marine toilets

Problem: On my boat I have a marine toilet. It is operated with salt water. The problem is, on the interior of the outflow tubing it accumulates some sort of hard grime. I am looking for a good way ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

How to determine stable electron states in ionic and covalent bonds?

I'm working on a program that needs to determine if a bond between two or more elements will result in a stable state. I understand at a high-level how to fill electron subshells using the Aufbau ...
8
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the correct name for this lab technique in crystallization?

Take a glass rod and rub vigorously the wall of the flask, the substance will crystallize out of the solution. Take a fire polished stirring rod and etch (scratch) the glass of your beaker. The small ...
16
votes
3answers
18k views

Why do Magnesium and Lithium form *covalent* organometallic compounds?

Lithium and magnesium are Group 1 and Group 2 elements respectively. Elements of these groups are highly ionic, and I've never heard of them forming significantly covalent inorganic compounds. Yet ...
22
votes
5answers
4k views

Are there any ionic amorphous solids?

This question on NaCl crystalization actually got me wondering: are there any ionic amorphous solids? Like ionic crystals are crystalline materials of electrostatically-attracted ions, can ions form ...
21
votes
4answers
3k views

How does NaCl maintain its crystalline structure?

My understanding is that $\mathrm{NaCl}$ is an ionic compound, in which $\mathrm{Cl}$ becomes (effectively) $\mathrm{Cl^-}$ and $\mathrm{Na}$ becomes $\mathrm{Na^+}$. So I understand why I would get a ...