Questions tagged [ionic-compounds]

Compounds in which at least some of bonds have ionic character stronger than covalent or metallic. Many compounds called salts are ionic compounds but not all of them.

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282 views

Why do we use different arguments for determining the strength of hydracids and solubility of ionic compounds?

HI is a stronger acid than HF. Why? Because when dissolved in water, the bigger iodide ion handles the negative charge way better than the small fluoride ion. So Iodide ion is a weak conjugate base ...
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Are metallic/ionic bonds weaker than covalent bonds?

In mineralogy class, I was taught that metallic and ionic bonds are weaker than covalent bonds and that's why quartz and diamond have such a high hardness value. However, in organic chemistry class, I ...
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Problems with creating sodium hydroxide from sodium (hydrogen) carbonate

If sodium hydrogen carbonate (baking soda, $\ce{NaHCO3}$) is heated to greater than $50~\mathrm{^\circ C}$, it will release carbon dioxide and water to form sodium carbonate: $$\ce{2NaHCO3 -> ...
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The Conductivity of Electrolytes based on structure of Ionic Crystal [closed]

Background I want to run an experiment to test the conductivity of various ionic compounds dissolved in water. I was hoping to see some sort of trend in the increase/decrease of conductivity based on ...
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377 views

How can an ionic bond have partial covalent in character? [duplicate]

I was going through the topic of 'ionic bond' and read this: No bond is 100% ionic in character. It has some percentage of covalent character. I didn't understand how an ionic bond can be ...
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Why does calcium carbonate decompose in sulphuric acid?

Here's the reaction: $\ce{H2SO4(aq) + CaCO3(s) -> CaSO4(s) + H2O(l) + CO2(g)}$ I don't understand why calcium carbonate decomposes in sulphuric acid. It's not soluble in water. I could ...
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How is NH4Cl a salt?

So what I know is, a salt is an ionic compound between a metal and a non-metal which exchange electrons. Like in $\ce{NaCl}$, $\ce{Na}$ is the metal and $\ce{Cl}$ is the non-metal, $\ce{Cl}$ hogs up ...
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Ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvent cation vs anion shape

If we consider an ionic liquid of a deep eutectic such as the choline chloride type DESs, why are ionic liquids (and deep eutectics) with not very symmetric cations and very symmetric anions more ...
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Metallic character of bonds?

Why in discussions of percent character of bonds, are only ionic and covalent bondings discussed? Do bonds not have a partial metallic character, and are either metallic and ionic-covalent?
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Identifying covalent character in ionic compounds when varying multiple ions

By Fajans' rules, we can easily find out which compound shows covalent character. Example: Among $\ce{NaCl}$, $\ce{MgCl2}$, $\ce{AlCl3}$ which one is more covalent? Answer: There is a point in ...
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Melting points of alkali metal halides

The correct order of melting point of alkali metal halides is: $\ce{MF}>\ce{MCl}>\ce{MBr}>\ce{MI}$ $\ce{MI}>\ce{MBr}>\ce{MCl}>\ce{MF}$ $\ce{MCl}>\ce{MF}>\ce{MBr}>\ce{MI}$ $\...
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What is the net ionic equation of sodium hydroxide when it dissolves in water?

What is the net ionic equation of sodium hydroxide when it dissolves in water? For the net ionic equation I got $$\ce{NaOH(s) + H2O(l) -> NaH+(aq) + OH- (aq) + H2O(l)}$$ but it was wrong. Then ...
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Find the pH of a sodium chloride solution using the extended Debye-Huckel equation

Question Use activities to calculate the pH of each of the following solutions, being sure to use $\mathrm{\alpha}$ values and the extended Debye-Huckel equation. The first one the ...
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How do you write the ionization equation for calcium hydroxide?

This is a base that would ionize completely, and the dissociation equation would look like this: $$\ce{Ca(OH)2 <--> Ca^2+ + 2OH-}$$ but how would I write the Brønsted equation with water? $$\ce{...
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Predicting color of precipitate

Is there any way of predicting whether a precipitate will be colored? I know that for solutions, transition metal ions with unfilled d-orbitals will have color because of d-orbital splitting in the ...
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How can sodium chloride melt ice or keep it frozen?

In European countries, they use $\ce{NaCl}$ or $\ce{KCl}$ to melt ice during the winter season. In Asian Countries, they use $\ce{NaCl}$ to keep the ice without melting, for example in ice cream and ...
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Why does silver sulfate not precipitate in this double displacement reaction?

Aqueous silver nitrate is mixed with aqueous sodium sulfate. We were asked to perform this reaction in lab in my chemistry class, and we did not observe a precipitant being formed. However, the ...
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What changes does zinc chloride undergo when ‘fusing’ on an atomic level? How does this influence reactivity?

I have been using a reaction with an organozincate starting material. This zincate is freshly prepared from zinc chloride and a Grignard reagent. The experimental procedure ‘handed down’ from more ...
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How does salt concentration affect corrosion rate of iron?

I have conducted an experiment where I test the affect of $\ce{NaCl}$ concentration on corrosion rate of iron. I did this in an environment were all of the iron was submerged in water and the water ...
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Why does phosphoric acid mask the colour of iron(III) complex in water?

In the redox titration of iron(III) with permanganate or dichromate, we use phosphoric(V) acid to "mask" the color of iron(III) because it interferes with the end point color change. What's the ...
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What is the correct Lewis structure for calcium phosphate?

In calcium phosphate, $\ce{Ca3(PO4)2}$, since the calcium and phosphate share an ionic bond, and the phosphorus and oxygen share a covalent bond, should the Lewis structure be like the following? ...
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Is it possible to freeze water by dissolving a salt?

Theoretically, by dissolving a salt in water the melting point lowers, approximately 1.86 K kg/mol, making it more difficult to freeze water. However, the process of dissolution of certain salts is ...
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Is melting/boiling point of ionically bonded substance higher than of covalently bound?

Is the melting and boiling point of ionic bond usually higher than covalent bond? I know that compounds with ionic bonds are usually solid at room temperature, so I want other answers than this. (...
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Can solutions of polar covalent compounds conduct electricity?

I learned in class that solutions of polar covalent compounds are weakly conductive, while ionic solutions are strongly conductive. But I'm getting different answers online. According to this lecture,...
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Are all ionic compounds salts?

According to Wikipedia: A salt is an ionic compound that can be formed by the neutralization reaction of an acid and a base. Are all ionic compounds salts? Are all salts ionic compounds?
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How can one determine the charge of a polyatomic ion? [closed]

I'm stuck on determining the charge on various polyatomic ions according to the rule of charge balance. I keep getting 0 for each of these, but wonder if that's not the case. $\ce{KMnO4}$ $\ce{K2C2O4}...
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1answer
196 views

How do the pKa and pH indicate to the proper environment of protonation?

I have been reading an abstract of a paper for a couple of minutes (reference below) but I cannot understand a piece of it. The abstract: The ionization state and $\mathrm pK_\mathrm a$ of the ...
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So, is baking soda actually a strong base? [duplicate]

Based on my recent thoughts, when baking soda ($\ce{NaHCO3}$) is dissolved in water, the following hydrolysis reaction occurs: $$\ce{NaHCO3 + H2O <=> NaOH + H2CO3}$$ However, $$\ce{H2CO3 -> ...
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Why is zinc deposited on copper when boiling an aqueous zinc sulfate solution?

I did an experiment where I dissolved 30 grams of zinc sulfate in water and boiled it with strips of solid zinc metal and strips of copper metal and a layer of zinc was deposited on the copper. I ...
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140 views

Ionic Compounds [closed]

Do elements share chemical or physical properties in an ionic compound? I mean if a metal would have an ionic compound with a nonmetal would the compound have physical properties of the metal and ...
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How to calculate the concentration of the elements after dissolution of iron(III) chloride?

I was presented with the following problem: In the laboratory you dissolve $\pu{24.7 g}$ of iron(III) chloride in a volumetric flask in water to a total volume of $\pu{375 ml}$. What is ...
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Is molten potassium nitrate possible?

Is it possible to melt potassium nitrate without it decomposing into potassium nitrite and oxygen? If so when it solidifies does it keep its oxidizing properties?
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Difference between lattice energy and thermal stability

For an ionic compound, is it always true that the greater the thermal stability, the greater the lattice energy. E.g. for 2 ionic compounds MX and MY, if MX has a higher thermal stability than MY, ...
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How can FeS2 be the formula of iron sulphide and CaC2 be the formula of calcium carbide?

I know that the valency of iron can either be 2 or 3 and so the formulae of the possible sulphides of iron should be $\ce{FeS}$ and $\ce{Fe2S3}$. But I have recently seen the formula $\ce{FeS2}$ used ...
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To what extent are the radius ratio rules valid for predicting the crystal structure of an ionic compound?

The ionic radii of $\ce{Ba^2+}$ and $\ce{O^2-}$ in barium oxide are $\pu{135pm}$ and $\pu{140pm}$, respectively. The ratio of the radius of $\ce{Ba^2+}$ to $\ce{O^2-}$ is approximately $0.964$. ...
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How does the electron configuration correlate with the emission spectrum of an ionic compound? [closed]

trying to find a way to correlate the electron configuration of an ionic compound (ie. Cupric sulfate, potassium chloride, Cupric chloride, sodium carbonate, strontium chloride) with its emission ...
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Why is lead (IV) chloride covalent while lead (II) chloride ionic? [duplicate]

I would like to find out more about what makes a compound ionic and what makes one covalent. However, I felt this was too general a question so I thought that asking about the chlorides of lead would ...
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What is the analogue of "molecule" for ionic compounds?

In a system, if we have $\pu{18 g}$ of $\ce{H2O}$ ($M_\mathrm r = 18$), we can say we have a mole of water molecules or $6 \times 10^{23}$ molecules. But in another system, if we have $\pu{342 g}$ of $...
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Why exactly does molten NaCl explode, when it is poured into water?

Why does molten $\ce{NaCl}$ explode, when it is poured into water? $\ce{NaCl}$ has a high melting point, $1074\ \mathrm{K}$ ($801~\mathrm{^\circ C}$). $\ce{NaCl}$ has a molar mass of $58.44\ \mathrm{g/...
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Effect of light on ionic compounds

If I had an ionic molecule which needed $\pu{4 eV}$ to break the ionic bond, a $\pu{7 eV}$ photon is shot at it. If it is absorbed by the molecule and breaks, where does the rest of the energy go?
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How do you explain the formula Fe3O4 using the ionic compound theory?

I don't understand at all how the ionic bonding in $\text{Fe}$$3$$\text{O}$$4$ works. The oxygens all together have $4(–2e)=–8e$ net charge. But we cannot give the three irons equal positive charges ...
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Crystal structure vs melting point

Calcium oxide has a melting point of $\ce{2700^\circ C}$ and sodium chloride has a melting point of $\pu{801^\circ C}$. If they have the same crystal structure and ions are about the same distance ...
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Rock salt structure: chloride lattice or sodium lattice?

Source From this diagram of the rock salt structure ($\ce{NaCl}$) we see that both the chloride and sodium ions have the same environment. That is to say, they each have the same number of neighbours ...
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How to know which ionic compound have the highest lattice energy without knowing the values of the radii?

Given two ionic compounds, for instance: $$\ce{CaS} \quad \mathrm{or} \quad \ce{KCl}$$ What is the procedure to predict which of the two have the highest lattice energy (in absolute value)? (...
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Manganates (II)

I want to ask about character of manganese(II) compounds. I read that $\ce{MnO}$ is basic, just like $\ce{Mn(OH)2}$. I started doing research and I read ions like $\ce{MnO2^{2-}}$ and $\ce{HMnO2^-}$ ...
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If I drink water without sipping, is there a chance of saliva diffusing into my bottle?

I always prefer to drink water without sipping, like this: I do this so that my saliva doesn't contaminate the water contents, which would make the water impossible to share with my friends. But ...
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1answer
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Why is the empirical formula of sodium chloride NaCl? [duplicate]

Since we know in sodium chloride crystal sodium ions are surrounded by $6$ chloride ions and each chloride ions are again bonded to $6$ sodium ions. What I want to know is that on what basis empirical ...
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Why does the conductivity of a LiOH solution decrease when boric acid is added?

If I start with pure water and add $\ce{LiOH}$ the conductivity of solution increases. However, if I then dissolve boric acid in the same solution the conductivity falls. I would have thought adding ...
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1answer
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What is melting? Which bonds do we break to melt something?

To melt diamond, we have to break the covalent bonds, which we can consider 'intermolecular' because it is one giant molecule. To melt Methane, we have to break the van der Waals (intermolecular) ...
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Why is there an increasing solubility in water for chlorides, chlorates, perchlorates in that order?

According to Wikipedia $\pu{100 mL}$ of water dissolve at $\pu{25 ^\circ{}C}$ about $\pu{35 g}$ of $\ce{NaCl}$ (1), but about $\pu{79 g}$ of $\ce{NaClO3}$ (2), and around $\pu{210 g}$ for $\ce{NaClO4}$...

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