Questions tagged [ionic-compounds]

Compounds in which at least some of bonds have ionic character stronger than covalent or metallic. Many compounds called salts are ionic compounds but not all of them.

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15
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1answer
14k views

Is KF the most ionic compound?

I saw somewhere (can't recall where) that KF is the most ionic compound. I expected CsF. Does the greater polarizability of Cs allow it to more easily form covalent bonds compared to K? Does this ...
38
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1answer
9k views

Can 100% covalent bonds exist?

Every covalent bond has some ionic character and every ionic bond some covalent character. I can understand why a completely ionic bond is an ideal situation. But completely covalent bonds can exist(?)...
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Will gaseous ionic compounds be free moving ions?

I knew while learning about electrolysis that if the ionic compound is molten it becomes free moving ions. If that is the case, what will happen if I continued heating till it reaches the boiling ...
15
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1answer
742 views

Why do different elements form different types of carbides?

What property of the elements make them form different types of carbides like: $\ce{Be}$ and $\ce{Al}$ - $\ce{Be2C}$ and $\ce{Al4C3}$ (Methanides) contains $\ce{C^4-}$ ion $\ce{Na}$ and $\ce{Ca}$ - $...
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4answers
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Why is CaCl2 called calcium chloride?

Doing a first year chem class. Just read through the molecular naming of compounds and now I'm confused as to why $\ce{CaCl2}$ is called calcium chloride and not calcium dichloride?
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1answer
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Are all NO3- salts soluble in water? If so, why?

All the examples of $\ce{NO3-}$ salts are soluble in water (all that I know about). Is it always so or there is some salt which doesn't dissolve in water? If so what is the reason behind it?
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3answers
2k views

Can a organic compounds such as hydrocarbons contain an ionic bond?

Can organic compounds like hydrocarbons have types of bonds other than covalent bonds? Can they also possess ionic bonds?
11
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1answer
412 views

What is the meaning of “superionic”?

I see the term "superionic" applied to high pressure water in articles like Giant planets may host superionic water, but I don't understand what the term really means. How is "superionic" ...
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Is KHF2 an ionic compound or a covalent compound?

The statement below is an excerpt from my school textbook:- Because of the tendency of fluorine to form hydrogen bond, metal fluorides are solvated by $\ce{HF}$ giving species of the type $\ce{...
13
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1answer
7k views

Is an ionic bond more like a covalent bond or an intermolecular force?

I have asked a question loosely asking this, where I confused terms and did not specify what I wanted to know here, so I formed a new question. What are the differences and similarities between ionic ...
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7answers
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Are metallic/ionic bonds weaker than covalent bonds?

In mineralogy class, I was taught that metallic and ionic bonds are weaker than covalent bonds and that's why quartz and diamond have such a high hardness value. However, in organic chemistry class, I ...
7
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1answer
15k views

Is the bond in HF ionic while it is covalent in HCl?

Why would a hydrogen atom "donate" to fluorine in an ionic bond but not in $\ce{HCl}$? Why would $\ce{H}$ and chlorine share instead of $\ce{Cl}$ just stripping it away like $\ce{F}$ does?
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4answers
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The impossibility of 100% ionic bond

Recently, I read the definition of oxidation state on Wikipedia. It read that a 100% ionic bond is impossible. So what does a 75% ionic and 25% covalent bond mean at all?
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2answers
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Is pyrite (FeS₂) an ionic or a covalent compound?

I have searched all over the web and found a lot of diverse explanations, but none of them are concluding exactly whether $\ce{FeS2}$ (solid - pyrite) is a covalent or an ionic compound. From ...
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3answers
770 views

In my homemade electrolysis setup, only the negative end bubbles?

I've created an electrolysis setup by connecting a $6~\mathrm{V}$ battery to a cup filled with saline water via pencils; I am confused as to why only the negative pencil bubbles though. After running ...
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3answers
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Why do Magnesium and Lithium form *covalent* organometallic compounds?

Lithium and magnesium are Group 1 and Group 2 elements respectively. Elements of these groups are highly ionic, and I've never heard of them forming significantly covalent inorganic compounds. Yet ...
9
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1answer
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What is Sodium Chloride like in gas state?

Since sodium chloride is sodium and chlorine atoms bonded as a lattice and there are no discrete molecules, doesn't that mean in gas state, sodium chloride is simply sodium and chlorine atoms separate ...
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1answer
2k views

Naming ionic compounds with multiple cations and anions

I have seen complex ionic compounds that have mixed anions and/or mixed cations. For Example I have seen this: $$\ce{NaKCl2}$$ Also known as Sodium Potassium Chloride. The only information I can ...
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2answers
599 views

What is the structural formula of alkali hypohalite: MOX or MXO?

Recently I came across this question and in the comment section, there was an argument regarding the formula of sodium hypoiodite which kept me wandering: what is the actual formula of alkali ...
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2answers
9k views

Calculating valence of oxides

Learning about Oxides. Basically when oxygen is combined with a metal. $$\ce{FeO}$$ This is called "Iron Oxide (II)" according to my book. Apparently, the II represents the valence. But how come? ...
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2answers
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Why is potassium phosphate KH2PO4 in this reaction?

This is a continuation of this question because the first thing that came in my mind is that why potassium phosphate in this reaction is $\ce{KH2PO4}$ and not $\ce{K3PO4}$? In the wikipedia article ...
10
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4answers
108k views

Is melting/boiling point of ionically bonded substance higher than of covalently bound?

Is the melting and boiling point of ionic bond usually higher than covalent bond? I know that compounds with ionic bonds are usually solid at room temperature, so I want other answers than this. (...
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1answer
926 views

What is the analogue of “molecule” for ionic compounds?

In a system, if we have $\pu{18 g}$ of $\ce{H2O}$ ($M_\mathrm r = 18$), we can say we have a mole of water molecules or $6 \times 10^{23}$ molecules. But in another system, if we have $\pu{342 g}$ of $...
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2answers
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Are ionic bonds stronger than covalent bonds?

A covalent bond involves overlapping of orbitals while an Ionic bond involves charge separation. Why are bonds formed by the overlapping of orbitals weaker than charge separation; why is an ionic ...
5
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1answer
6k views

Are all ionic compounds salts?

According to Wikipedia: A salt is an ionic compound that can be formed by the neutralization reaction of an acid and a base. Are all ionic compounds salts? Are all salts ionic compounds?
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Reaction between zinc and sulfur

Would the reaction between zinc and sulfur be $$\ce{Zn_{(s)} + S_{(s)} -> ZnS_{(s)}}$$ or $$\ce{8 Zn_{(s)} + S_8\ _{(s)} -> 8ZnS_{(s)}}$$ I know that $\ce{S}$ and $\ce{S8}$ are allotropes of ...
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2answers
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Is beryllium difluoride covalent or ionic?

My textbook says that despite the large electronegativity difference $\ce{BeF2}$ is covalent since the beryllium ion will have too much charge density and it will attract the fluorine electron cloud ...
3
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3answers
943 views

Why is PbCl₄ covalent?

My answer: The inert pair effect in $\ce{Pb}$ causes it to pull back the electrons, resulting in polarisation. My teacher's answer: An ionisation state of $+4$ is too difficult to achieve, and it is ...
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1answer
2k views

What is the colour of chromium(III) chloride solution?

I had a question asking about the colour of the solution of chromium(III) chloride in my exam, all my colleagues have different answers, I couldn't find any exact answer after searching!
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1answer
147 views

Unknown salt formed from electrolysis of urine

I am not sure what I was expecting to happen with this but I created a circuit to electrolyze various household liquids. My electrodes are copper — or at least claim to be, I think they might just be ...
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3answers
2k views

What is the correct name for this lab technique in crystallization?

Take a glass rod and rub vigorously the wall of the flask, the substance will crystallize out of the solution. Take a fire polished stirring rod and etch (scratch) the glass of your beaker. The small ...
7
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1answer
11k views

Does water ionically bond to chloride ion?

This user absolutely insists that when a chloride ion is present in water (for example, when $\ce{NaCl}$ dissolves in water) that $\ce{Cl-}$ ion is ionically bound to the hydrogen atom: https://...
6
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1answer
2k views

Why is benzenediazonium fluoroborate water insoluble and stable at room temperature?

Benzenediazonium fluoroborate is water insoluble and stable at room temperature. Why is this salt, water insoluble? Also I am told that benzenediazonium salts are stable only at low temperature(<5°...
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1answer
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Why exception is noted in the solubility of lead salts?

There are many exception in the solubility of lead salts like: Lead sulfate is insoluble in cold water whereas most of the sulfates are soluble in cold water. Lead chloride is also insoluble in cold ...
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3answers
2k views

Is there a word for a compound that has both ionic and covalent bonds?

For example, calcium carbide (CaC$_2$) has covalent C‒C bonds and ionic Ca$^{2+}$‒ C$_2^{2-}$ bonds.
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2answers
423 views

Nomenclature of polyatomic ions

Is there a way to remember polyatomic ions (i.e $\ce{PO4^{3-}}$, $\ce{SO4^{2-}}$ etc.). For example, our professor will ask on an exam what the equation for iron (III) carbonate. Obviously the (III) ...
3
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1answer
365 views

Alkalide compounds

I have read much more about metallic hydrides but I am totally confused about "inverse alkali hydrides" or "hydrogen alkalides" while reading refer to this. What are these compounds and how do they ...
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2answers
5k views

Rock salt structure: chloride lattice or sodium lattice?

Source From this diagram of the rock salt structure ($\ce{NaCl}$) we see that both the chloride and sodium ions have the same environment. That is to say, they each have the same number of neighbours ...
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5answers
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Why does a Fluoride ion only have a -1 charge and not a -2 charge or more?

Transition elements can form ions with different charges. Why can't elements other than transition elements form ions with different charges? If it is a Fluoride ion, why does it have to be an anion ...
2
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1answer
3k views

How would one compare the magnitude of covalent character between SnCl4 and SnF2 using Fajan's Rules?

It is easy to compare two ionic compounds when one of the ions is same. However, how do we compare two compounds if one of the ions is the same element but just has different charge and the other ion ...
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1answer
7k views

What is the formula of manganese oxohydroxide: MnOOH and MnO(OH)2?

I found various formulae of manganese oxohydroxide. Some site says it is $\ce{MnOOH}$, other say it is, $\ce{MnO(OH)2}$. So, which one is correct? The mineral manganite is considered manganese oxide-...
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2answers
11k views

What determines whether a double displacement reaction will occur?

In normal displacement reactions, reactivity plays a large role and sometimes the reaction doesn't even happen. So is there anything limiting double displacement reactions? For example $\ce{2KI + Pb(...
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1answer
7k views

What is melting? Which bonds do we break to melt something?

To melt diamond, we have to break the covalent bonds, which we can consider 'intermolecular' because it is one giant molecule. To melt Methane, we have to break the van der Waals (intermolecular) ...
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4answers
3k views

How does NaCl maintain its crystalline structure?

My understanding is that $\mathrm{NaCl}$ is an ionic compound, in which $\mathrm{Cl}$ becomes (effectively) $\mathrm{Cl^-}$ and $\mathrm{Na}$ becomes $\mathrm{Na^+}$. So I understand why I would get a ...
14
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3answers
9k views

Why exactly does molten NaCl explode, when it is poured into water?

Why does molten $\ce{NaCl}$ explode, when it is poured into water? $\ce{NaCl}$ has a high melting point, $1074\ \mathrm{K}$ ($801~\mathrm{^\circ C}$). $\ce{NaCl}$ has a molar mass of $58.44\ \mathrm{...
7
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1answer
71k views

Dipole moment - calculation of percentage ionic character

Question: The dipole moment of $\ce{HBr}$ is $2.60 \times 10^{-30}$ and the interatomic spacing is $1.41$. What is the percentage ionic character of $\ce{HBr}$? What I know is that the percentage ...
6
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3answers
13k views

How can sodium chloride melt ice or keep it frozen?

In European countries, they use $\ce{NaCl}$ or $\ce{KCl}$ to melt ice during the winter season. In Asian Countries, they use $\ce{NaCl}$ to keep the ice without melting, for example in ice cream and ...
0
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1answer
8k views

Melting points of alkali metal halides

The correct order of melting point of alkali metal halides is: $\ce{MF}>\ce{MCl}>\ce{MBr}>\ce{MI}$ $\ce{MI}>\ce{MBr}>\ce{MCl}>\ce{MF}$ $\ce{MCl}>\ce{MF}>\ce{MBr}>...
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3answers
15k views

The Crisscross method for finding the chemical formula

I am reading this wikipedia article that I don't understand. What I don't understand is: suppose we have two elements $X$ and $Y$ having oxidation numbers $x$ and $y$ respectively. Can we prove ...
8
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3answers
11k views

Chemically removing rust without leaving any unwanted residues

I have this iron pan that got rusty from not being properly dried. Scrubbing it I was able to get rid of most of the rust, but there's still some I just can't remove. I thought I could chemically ...