Questions tagged [inorganic-chemistry]

Inorganic compounds generally do not have C-H bonds, while organic compounds do have such bonds. The distinction between inorganic and organic chemistry, however, is far from absolute.

908 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
20 votes
0 answers
1k views

What is d-orbital collapse?

When I was perusing the works of Schwarz on atomic structure, I came across the unfamiliar term of d-orbital collapse. He describes it as a variation in energetic sequence from group 1 to 3 elements ...
C. WJ's user avatar
  • 201
11 votes
1 answer
292 views

What is this golden looking substance?

I am currently messing around with gallium compromising aluminum. I am using a titalium lock which is just a brand of aluminum padlock and I put a gallium-indium euctic alloy on the surface of it. It’...
killakrab's user avatar
  • 127
10 votes
0 answers
19k views

Why does the reaction of sodium nitrate, aluminium, and sodium hydroxide yield ammonia?

From Russian test problem 4301: $$\ce{3NaNO3 + 8Al + 5NaOH + 18H2O -> 8Na[Al(OH)4] + 3NH3(g)}$$ How does ammonia evolve here? Is it that we get hydrogen gas evolving in the reaction between Al and ...
CowperKettle's user avatar
  • 3,266
9 votes
0 answers
148 views

Why are vapours of xenon hexafluoride coloured?

According to Wikipedia, [...] It is a colorless solid that readily sublimes into intensely yellow vapors. It is clear from the above statement that $\ce{XeF6}$ is colourless in solid form. But why ...
Infinite's user avatar
  • 1,634
9 votes
1 answer
10k views

Order of Basicity of Nitrogen Trihalides

I was asked to arrange nitrogen tri-halides in order of increasing basicity. On looking up the answer online, it turned out to be the following: $\ce{NF3}$ < $\ce{NCl3}$ < $\ce{NBr3}$ < $\ce{...
NightMare's user avatar
  • 101
8 votes
0 answers
248 views

Why is octaoxygen diamagnetic?

I tried considering that according to LCAO-MO theory $\ce{O2}$ is paramagnetic, which is confirmed by experimental evidence. Since octaoxygen has the crystal structure in figure, I thought there is a ...
Colard's user avatar
  • 189
8 votes
0 answers
603 views

Identifying Alkyl Ligands as Pi Donors or Pi Acceptors in Transition Metal Complexes

Just wondering if there was a systematic way to identify an alkyl ligand as a $\pi$ acceptor or $\pi$ donor in a transition metal complex? Although various sources indicate that weak field ligands ...
doarfo's user avatar
  • 81
8 votes
0 answers
343 views

Isolating radium oxide

Why is radium oxide yet to be isolated when a wide range of other radium (II) compounds are known ?
J. LS's user avatar
  • 2,570
7 votes
0 answers
564 views

Does solvate isomers exist for coordination compounds with ammonia solvent as ligand?

I could find many sources confirming the hydrate isomerism(with water as solvent) but I couldn't find any information about any other solvent. In all the sources "hydrate/solvate isomerism" ...
Govind's user avatar
  • 318
7 votes
0 answers
224 views

Why does lithium aluminium hydride appear grey?

Commercial lithium aluminium hydride is a grey compound, which loses a lot of reactivity the darker it is. Luckily you can clean it up to get the reactive white compound and the separated grey ...
Justanotherchemist's user avatar
7 votes
0 answers
1k views

Why isn't orthoboric acid soluble in cold water even though it has polar B-OH bonds?

This is the information I found regarding orthoboric acid's solubility: Textbook (NCERT India): Sparingly soluble in water (didn't say what temperature - presumably cold) and highly soluble in hot ...
Anurag Baundwal's user avatar
7 votes
0 answers
108 views

How well will molten iron chrysolite (fayalite) react with hydrogen?

The equation balances nicely, but would the reaction tend to proceed this way? What temperature and time would be needed? $\ce{Fe2SiO4 + 2H2 -> 2H2O + 2Fe + SiO2}$ There is no problem with ...
kim holder's user avatar
7 votes
0 answers
4k views

Is there a difference between hydrated oxides and hydroxides?

My guess is that they are different. I think hydrated oxides would have a lattice with the cation and oxide anions as lattice points and molecules of water trapped in interstitial spaces, while ...
Binary Geek's user avatar
  • 1,068
7 votes
0 answers
377 views

What is the most accepted explanation of aurophilicity?

Gold has a special property called aurophilicity. Inorganic chemistry by Huheey has some explanation, but that was not enough to clear the conception.
user avatar
7 votes
0 answers
545 views

Ligand strength - Coulombic effect and/or Electronegativities?

According to my teacher, these three Lewis bases generally decrease in strength in the following order: Ammonia Water Hydroxide ion I agree. However, he argues that their ability to act as Lewis ...
Dissenter's user avatar
  • 18.8k
7 votes
2 answers
3k views

Nature of a1g Molecular Orbital Interactions in Ferrocene

While learning about ferrocene I've come across this molecular orbital diagram. What particularly confused me is the nature of the a'1g orbital. My professor taught that a'1g and e2g are considered ...
Anson's user avatar
  • 71
6 votes
0 answers
424 views

How to explain oxidizing power from Molecular Orbital Theory

I am trying to explain the oxidizing property of $\ce{Fe^3+}$ in $\ce{H2O}$ and $\ce{CN^-}$ which is $\ce{[Fe(H2O)6]^3+}$ and $\ce{[Fe(CN)6]^3-}$. The electrochemical reactions along with their ...
Shira's user avatar
  • 447
6 votes
0 answers
2k views

Does fluoride anion ever act as a strong field ligand?

In the case of $\ce{[Fe(H2O)6]^3+}$ there are $5$ unpaired electrons as water acts as a weak field ligand. But instead of fluoride acting as a weak field ligand in the $\ce{[MnF6]^4-}$ , why does it ...
Som V. Tambe's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
2k views

Why is the N-N bond length greater in dinitrogen trioxide than in dinitrogen tetroxide?

Why is the N-N bond length greater in dinitrogen trioxide than in dinitrogen tetroxide? If the lone pair on $\ce{N}$ in $\ce{N2O3}$ delocalises, then the $\ce{N-N}$ bond will have a double bond ...
Parth Mall's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
882 views

Coordination Numbers and Hybridization schemes of anions

Draw the molecular structures of (a) the borax anion, $\ce{[B4O5(OH)4]^2-}$ (b) the peroxoborate anion, $\ce{[B2(O2)2(OH)4]^2-}$ ...
thylmanoid's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
206 views

I found transition states (TS), but calculations aren't supported by experiment. Do I look for more TSs or somewhere else?

I'm using Gaussian to investigate a catalyst system. Experimental evidence showed that one of three analogues (R = phenyl, Ph), yielded a benzosultam when treated with 2,4,6-...
Amotttier's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
904 views

Mechanism for the decomposition of HI

I've been trying to find the mechanism for the gas phase decomposition of hydrogen iodide: $$\ce{ 2 HI (g) <=> H2 (g) + I2 (g)} $$ Anyone know of sources where I can get information on this? I ...
rhody's user avatar
  • 161
6 votes
0 answers
2k views

How to compare the oxidizing power of perhalate ions

In my book the oxidizing power in descending order of the following is given as: $\ce{BrO4-} > \ce{IO4-} > \ce{ClO4-}$ My doubt is regarding their order of oxidizing tendency. I thought that ...
Shubham's user avatar
  • 491
6 votes
1 answer
436 views

Is there a selective wet etch of Bi2O3 Bismuth Oxide?

I'm looking for a wet etch of Bismuth Oxide that does not etch $\ce{Bi}$ itself. There are obviously chemicals that etch $\ce{Bi2O3}$, but $\ce{Bi}$ is pretty fragile, so almost everything I've found ...
YungHummmma's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
157 views

Methylation of perchlorate

I am exploring (non-experimentally!) the methylation of a perchlorate precursor, either the acid or pre-existing salts, to produce the alkali methyl perchlorate. The methylating agent would be methane ...
Dave's user avatar
  • 83
5 votes
0 answers
118 views

Will charcoal (carbon) oxidize in the air?

Wikipedia — Carbon sequestration claims that burying charcoal into the soil offsets $\ce{CO2}$ and thus reduces the greenhouse effect: In the soil, the biochar carbon is unavailable for oxidation to $...
user1876484's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
161 views

Does chromium(III) oxide react with or dissolve in liquid sulfur dioxide?

Liquid $\ce{SO2}$ (b.p. −10 °C) is known as a versatile solvent (yet not particularly pleasant to work with) for a wide range of organic and inorganic compounds having limited solubility in ...
andselisk's user avatar
  • 37.6k
5 votes
1 answer
57 views

How to make a thin layer of crystalline barium titanate on copper substrate?

Is it possible to create a thin $\ce{BaTiO3}$ crystal layer on a copper plate by putting the plate in a beaker, pouring in heated hydrofluoric acid that has been saturated with $\ce{BaTiO3}$ powder ...
Martin Kontsek's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
387 views

Is the formation of nitrogen dioxide spontaneous?

I was studying Thermodynamics from my Chemistry textbook (page 181-182, section 6.6 (a)). I have a question regarding the following text from my book. Now let us examine the following reactions: $$\...
Silica19's user avatar
  • 125
5 votes
0 answers
117 views

Aren't electrophilic addition reactions of alkenes also nucleophilic addition reactions?

And if they are nucleophilic substitution reactions as well, then why do we not call them "electrophilic and nucleophilic addition reactions of alkenes"? Consider the reaction between ethene ...
Vedant Rana's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
177 views

What determines the kind of Bravais lattice structure (body-centred cubic, hexagonal, etc) a transition metal shows?

With the exception of Zn, Hg, Cd and Mn transition metals most transition metals have only one kind of lattice structure at room temperature. Another trend I noticed was that Groups 3 and 4 have ...
Tatai's user avatar
  • 317
5 votes
0 answers
581 views

Explanation of the trans-effect (thermodynamic and kinetic) for octahedral transition metal complexes

The thermodynamic trans effect refers to the ground state weakening of the metal-ligand bond in a complex by a ligand trans to it. The kinetic trans effect is the lablisation of a ligand in a complex ...
S R Maiti's user avatar
  • 5,675
5 votes
0 answers
248 views

Invisible spin allowed transitions in Tanabe-Sugano diagrams

In class we are looking at Tanabe-Sugano diagrams, more concretely at transitions for a d2 complex. I understand that the only spin allowed transitions are those that have a triplet state, therefore ...
Palamalama's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
338 views

Why does beryllium have an exceptionally high hydration energy?

You would expect solubility of Group $2$ fluorides to increase down the group, as lattice energy plummets much more sharply than hydration energy does. For the most part, this is true: $\ce{BaF2}$ is ...
Ray Bradbury's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
73 views

Wittig reagent with metal–oxo bonds

Could you use the Wittig reagent to attack a metal–oxo bond and replace the oxygen with a carbene? Specifically, is it possible for the Wittig reagent to do σ-bond metathesis with an electrophilic ...
Park Kim's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
310 views

Molecular orbital diagram for carbene-metal and carbodiphosphorane-metal interaction

I am interested in understanding how carbenes and carbodiphosphoranes interact differently with a transition metals. I would like to use qualitative molecular orbital theory arguments (with an ...
Yoda's user avatar
  • 4,713
5 votes
0 answers
409 views

Interference of Ca-EDTA with fluoride delivery in mouthwash

The goal of fluoride mouthwash is to deliver $\ce{F-}$ to the surface of the teeth to turn hydroxyapatite in the dental enamel into fluorapatite. Typically sodium fluoride or stannous fluoride are ...
vodona's user avatar
  • 315
5 votes
0 answers
100 views

What is tetrasulfur like? Why is there so little experimental information about it?

Phys.org's How sulfur helped make Earth habitable before the rise of oxygen says Mapping the bonds and vibrational modes of molecules containing sulfur isotopes is helping to shed light on the ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 5,788
5 votes
0 answers
370 views

diborane fragment orbitals energy of dihydrogen

I want to ask a question about the fragment orbitals of the $\ce{B2H6}$ system, specifically when I combine the $\ce{B2H4}$ with the $\ce{H2}$ fragments. I am halfway through my inorganic chemistry ...
vik1245's user avatar
  • 1,230
5 votes
0 answers
4k views

Why are B-O-H and B-O-C angles in B(OH)3 and B(OCH3)3, respectively are higher than normal?

In Concise Inorganic Chemistry by JD Lee (4th edition; adapted by Sudarshan Guha), page 77 under the topic "Back Bonding" it is given: The $\mathrm{2p}\pi$-$\mathrm{2p}\pi$ back bonding in $\ce{B(...
Vishnu's user avatar
  • 2,050
5 votes
0 answers
782 views

Solubility of PbSO4

The solubility of $\ce{PbSO4(s)}$ increase with the addition of $\ce{H2SO4}.$ Why? I don't quite understand this. When dissolving $\ce{PbSO4(s)}$ we get the equilibrium equation: $$\ce{PbSO4(s) <=...
Kdbmvp's user avatar
  • 79
5 votes
0 answers
888 views

What is the magnetic moment of potassium hexacyanochromate(II)?

I calculated the magnetic moment of $\ce{K4[Cr(CN)6]}$? in the following way: $\ce{Cr^{+2}}$ has $4$ d electrons. And since $\ce{CN-}$ is a strong field ligand, the electrons will pair up in the $\...
SmarthBansal's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
1k views

Why is bis(1,2,2,6,6-Pentamethyl-4-Piperidinyl) Sebacate used as a "bottom coat" for a superhydrophobic coating?

According to this MSDS sheet, a compound named bis(1,2,2,6,6-Pentamethyl-4-Piperidinyl) Sebacate is used in the "bottom coat" layer before a "top coat" of superhydrophobic NeverWet coating is applied. ...
user391339's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
2k views

Why is hexacyanoferrate(II) colored and at the same time diamagnetic?

I am wondering why $\ce{[Fe(CN)6]^4-}$ is colored and at the same time diamagnetic. For a transition metal to be diamagnetic all the electrons should be paired up in the d orbitals and at the same ...
paul's user avatar
  • 75
5 votes
0 answers
1k views

Does the wavelength of light absorbed by a complex depend upon extent of splitting or stability?

Background: we were doing Crystal Field Theory in school when this question popped up. Specifically we were talking about stability obtained due to the chelate effect and if the extra stability in a ...
Shivay Vadhera's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
649 views

Why do nitrogen molecules not act as ligands in haemoglobin?

Nitrogen molecules $(\ce{N2})$ have lone pairs, which, as far as I know, is the property of oxygen molecules $(\ce{O2})$ that allows them to act as ligands bonding to iron in haemoglobin in the blood. ...
Matt Whitelock's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
127 views

Wade's rules applied to metallic elements

There are many examples of metallic clusters that distort from the structure predicted by Wade's rules to a more 'spherical', closo-like arrangement. For example, $\ce{Bi8^2+}$ is a square antiprism ...
GingerBadger's user avatar
  • 1,696
5 votes
0 answers
1k views

What are the factors that affect the redox reactions?

In my work, I used $\ce{Co(OH)2}$ and $\ce{Ni(OH)2}$ as an active materials to fabricate as symmetric supercapacitors in which I used 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide as an electrolyte. From ...
Grace Ketsuda's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
51 views

Cytotoxicity of Ru-complexes

I have a basic question: why are Ru(II)-complexes cytotoxic? What I know is that depending on the used ligand some of them interact with the DNA either via DNA-pi-stacking (intercalation) or binding ...
V.Fly's user avatar
  • 51
5 votes
0 answers
4k views

Effect of temperature and pressure on structure of solids

What is the effect of these conditions on the structure of solids? My book has the answer that confuses me. I got nothing about it. Can you please explain? The answer of the book is With the ...
Gurbir Singh's user avatar

1
2 3 4 5
19