Questions tagged [free-energy]

Also known as Gibbs energy, it is the enthalpy minus the product of thermodynamic temperature and entropy.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
35
votes
4answers
31k views

What is the difference between ∆G and ∆G°?

In Brady's Molecular Nature of Matter, I read that $\Delta_\mathrm{r} G^{\circ}$ is $\Delta_\mathrm{r} G$ at $25~^\circ\mathrm{C}$. But later, it gives a value for $\Delta_\mathrm{r} G^\circ$ at ...
19
votes
2answers
2k views

Which equilibrium constant is appropriate to use?

I have learnt that the standard free energy change is related to the equilibrium constant of a reaction by, $$\Delta G^\circ = -RT \ln K$$ Here, does $K$ refer to $K_p$ or $K_c$? Also, please give ...
12
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there a reason for the mathematical form of the equilibrium constant? [duplicate]

Why are the two molarities multiplied and not added, and why is each raised to the power of the coefficient rather than multiplied by it? What is the reasoning behind this form? Was it simply ...
6
votes
1answer
20k views

Derivation of relationship between equilibrium constant and Gibbs free energy change

Why is $\Delta G=\Delta G^o+RT\ln Q?$ It feels like all online sources were written for introductory Chemistry students! Where do I find a rigorous proof of this identity? Greatly appreciate it!
1
vote
2answers
194 views

What is wrong in this argument that dG must always be zero?

Under constant temperature and pressure, the change of the Gibbs free energy can be written as $$\mathrm dG_\textrm{sys} = \mathrm dH_\mathrm{sys} - T\,\mathrm dS_\mathrm{sys}$$ And in the textbook ...
10
votes
1answer
3k views

Why does the Gibbs free energy only correspond to non-expansion work?

It has been defined as the energy available for work other than expansion work. Why can't it be used for expansion work
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Why does equilibrium exist?

I've read an article that equilibrium exists when $G$ (Gibbs free energy) becomes minimum. If formation of products decreases Gibbs free energy, why won't the reaction proceed to completion so that ...
29
votes
5answers
110k views

Difference between exothermic and exergonic

In High School I learned that an exothermic reactions releases energy, while an endothermic reaction needs energy to occur. Now I learned that there is a separate, somewhat similar classification ...
25
votes
4answers
16k views

Why does water evaporate spontaneously at room temperature despite ΔG > 0?

Standard Gibbs free energy of formation of liquid water at $\pu{298 K}$ is $\pu{−237.17 kJ mol-1}$ and that of water vapour is $\pu{−228.57 kJ mol-1}$ therefore, $$\ce{H2O (l) -> H2O (g)}\qquad\...
37
votes
4answers
26k views

Gibbs free energy-minimum or zero?

A reaction proceeds towards the direction of lesser Gibbs free energy (at constant $T$ (temperature) and $P$ (pressure)). So, we could say that Gibbs free energy at equilibrium is minimum. On the ...
11
votes
3answers
4k views

What is the difference between ΔG and ΔrG?

Consider the reaction $$\ce{A -> B}$$ The reaction Gibbs free energy, $\Delta_\mathrm{r} G$ is given by the following equation $$\Delta_\mathrm{r} G = \Delta_\mathrm{r} G^\circ + RT \ln Q$$ Now ...
14
votes
3answers
5k views

Transition state and free energy

We have products $\ce{A + B}$ combining to form $\ce{C + D}$ through the transition state $\ce{X}$. Are all reactions at least virtually reversible? Is the difference between a reversible reaction ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Pressure at which graphite and diamond are in equilibrium

I came across this problem : The standard state Gibbs free energies of formation of C(graphite) and C(diamond) at $T = \pu{298 K}$ are $\pu{0 kJ mol-1}$ and $\pu{2.9 kJ mol-1}$, respectively. The ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Gibbs Free Energy and Maximum Work

I am a high school student and my professor mentioned that the Gibbs free energy is the maximum amount of work (or useful work) that a system can do, whereas entropy is a measure of the non-available ...
4
votes
2answers
366 views

Equilibrium constant. Can it be reached?

Consider the reaction below: $$\ce{A + B <=> C}$$ Suppose that the equilibrium constant for this reaction is $K = 10$. I then prepare a reaction vessel with volume of $\pu{1 dm^{-3}}$ which ...
3
votes
2answers
12k views

What is the correct definition of the Gibbs free energy of activation?

Is the following correct? Gibbs free energy of activation is used in energy profiles where the stabilities of the species are expressed as changes in Gibbs energy, while the activation energy Ea is ...
2
votes
4answers
5k views

Are all exothermic reactions spontaneous?

$\ce{GaAs (s)}$ is used in solar cells deployed on satellites found in the orbit of Earth. The best way to make these materials is through a technique called "molecular beam epitaxy", in ...
11
votes
2answers
5k views

Is the Gibbs standard free energy always constant?

I am a biochemistry student and we are learning about thermodynamics. Is the Gibbs standard free energy for a reaction always constant? The equation below suggests that it changes with temperature: $$...
4
votes
3answers
626 views

If change in free energy (G) is positive, how do those reactions still occur?

I was doing a couple of problems for homework: Calculate $K_\mathrm{sp}$ of $\ce{AgI}$ at $55.0\ \mathrm{^\circ C}$ Calculate $K_\mathrm{b}$ of $\ce{NH3}$ at $36.0\ \mathrm{^\circ C}$ I have to use ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

Why exactly are standard potentials additive?

I don't really study chemistry so while my question may be very obvious, its not obvious to me. If we take an electrochemical reaction like $$\ce{2Fe^2+ + Au^3+ -> 2Fe^3+ + Au+}$$ we can find its ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

How is hydration free energy of a solute measured experimentally?

I am reading a paper (Shirts, M. R.; and Pitera, J. W. and Swope, W. C. and Pande, V. S. J. Chem. Phys. 2003, 119, 5740-5761). Near the beginning of the paper (page 5745), the authors state: ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Which step below is rate determining

What is the rate determining step in the following energy profile? To clarify, the reaction is: A -> B -> C The energy of A is greater than B which in turn is also greater than C. The intermediate A-...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

How to derive the relation between gibbs energy and equilibrium constant?

I want to understand the derivation between gibbs energy and equillibrium constant $$\Delta G=\Delta G^o+RT\ln Q?$$ I have seen a similar post on CSE Derivation of relationship between equilibrium ...
1
vote
1answer
515 views

Proving RTln($a_i$) equal to non PV work done by system,where $a_i$ is activity

We know that chemical potential is defined as ${\mu}_i={\mu}_i^{standard}+RT\ln(a_i)$. Here $a_i$ is the activity of $i^\text{th}$ component of solution. In case of gases instead of $a_i$ it is $f_i$ (...
10
votes
1answer
13k views

What is non-expansion work?

I learnt that Gibbs free energy is the maximum amount of non-expansion work. But the phrase non expansion work confuses me. Work is defined as pressure times change in volume. If there is no expansion,...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

What are the units that measure free energy?

Is it $\pu{kJ/mol}$? I have done problems and I always end up with these units, but is this correct?
8
votes
2answers
18k views

What is the difference between ΔG and ΔG “with an o on top”? [duplicate]

What is the difference between $\Delta G$ and $\Delta G^\circ$? I couldn't figure it out. Ex: $\Delta G^\circ = -RT\ln K$ $\Delta G = \Delta G^\circ + RT \ln Q$ What is the difference, is it that $\...
8
votes
2answers
16k views

Derivation of relationship between Gibbs free energy and electrochemical cell potential

Why is $\Delta G = -nFE$? I don't understand what the motivation is behind this definition. Was it derived or just given? The textbook provides no justification for this equation. In fact, much of ...
7
votes
3answers
8k views

Is there a way to experimentally measure entropy?

I've been doing thermodynamic chemistry, and recently focusing on Gibbs Free Energy. Whilst doing calculations using, $$\Delta G = \Delta H - T \Delta S$$ I have been given a table of values for $\...
7
votes
3answers
6k views

Where to find data for Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy?

Where can you find the enthalpy and Gibbs free energy of formation and entropy of compounds either as a data file or web API? Technically, I only need two since I can figure out the other one from two ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

Pourbaix diagram – writing reactions

How would you go about writing the reaction between water and chromium metal under standard acid and base conditions? I know you would have to look at the vertical lines at pH 0 and 14 but I don’t ...
2
votes
1answer
408 views

Gibbs free energy=potential free energy? (Transition state theory)

Online I found the plot Gibbs free energy vs. reaction coordinate: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transition_state_theory and on many books I found the plot potential energy vs. reaction coordinate (...
14
votes
3answers
1k views

Why can't a reaction go to completion?

What is the reason for why an exergonic reaction would still have some remaining reactants (or an endergonic reaction to have any products)? The explanation given on this page (see Chemical reactions ...
12
votes
2answers
1k views

Can single molecules of C and O2 react in isolation, and if so how will momentum be conserved?

I am trying to figure out how is it possible to reconcile the reality of exothermic reactions, which means that kinetic energy is transferred to (heats) the surrounding matter, with the principle of ...
10
votes
2answers
3k views

What kind of equilibrium constant we use for Gibbs free energy and Van't Hoff equation?

We know that the Gibbs free energy is related to the equilibrium constant by the following equation: $$\Delta_\mathrm{r}G^\circ=-RT\ln K$$ We also know the Van't Hoff equation: $$\ln\left(\frac{K_2}{...
7
votes
3answers
866 views

Truly Understanding the Second Law of Thermodynamics and Entropy

There are some seemingly contradictory things I’d like cleared up: Second Law states: $\mathrm dS_\text{univ} = \mathrm dS_\text{sys} + \mathrm dS_\text{surr}$, and $\mathrm dS_\text{univ}$ is always ...
8
votes
1answer
19k views

What is the difference between enthalpy of formation and Gibbs free energy of formation?

I'm having trouble (not alone, apparently) understanding the concept of Gibbs free energy, but I'm beginning to. What I still don't understand, however, is how Gibbs free energy of formation differs ...
8
votes
2answers
18k views

How to determine the value for n in the Gibbs free energy and redox potential equation?

I am having a problem with this equation for redox potentials $$\Delta G = -nFE_\mathrm{cell}$$ In this equation I never am totally sure about what the value of $n$ should be, for example for the ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Rate-limiting in transition state theory

Suppose an initial state $A$ can transition to either state $C$ or state $D$. Suppose further that both of these two processes are rate-limited by a transition to the same intermediate state $B$, as ...
4
votes
1answer
11k views

Why are Kc and Kp interchangeable in the free energy-equilibrium equation? [duplicate]

In this equation that relates Standard free energy and the equilibrium constant: $\Delta Gº=-RT \ln K_{eq}$ My textbook (and my teacher) say both $K_p$ (constant related to pressure) and $K_c$ (...
4
votes
1answer
180 views

How can -G/T and -A/T be thought of as 'disguised' entropies?

I understand that entropy is defined as $\mathrm{d}S=\mathrm{d}q/T$ for a reversible change but I fail to see why $-G/T$ and $-A/T$ can be thought of as 'disguised' entropies. This is a question on my ...
3
votes
1answer
115 views

Assumption behind Gibbs energy and maximum work

I'm somewhat confused by this derivation (in Schroeder's Book of Thermal Physics) of the fact that in a closed system, the change in the Gibbs Energy is always less than the Non-Expansion work done on ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Difference between chemical potential and gibbs free energy

I know that the chemical potential is the molar Gibbs free energy and that it is an intensive variable and that the gibbs free energy is extensive. However, they have identical units: $\mathrm{J~mol^{-...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Correlation between the equilibrium constant and delta G

I understand this up until the last two steps. How does $\ln(K_\mathrm{eq})$ become $2{,}303\log(K_\mathrm{eq})$ and how does $-RT\cdot2{,}303$ become $-1{,}42$?
3
votes
1answer
447 views

Why isn't standard Gibbs free energy always zero?

I read in my textbook that one of the standard conditions we should use when calculating the standard Gibbs free energy is having a concentration of 1 M of all the reagents and the products in the ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

Can a reaction with positive Gibbs free energy change ever occur?

If you have an endothermic reaction with a negative entropy change, is it still possible to induce the reaction in some way despite the fact that the Gibbs free energy change is positive or all ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Can we force reactions with positive delta G?

Do these reactions always have to be paired with another energetically favorable reaction with a greater delta G magnitude, or is there a way to force reactions with a positive delta G to happen?
3
votes
1answer
4k views

Relation between equilibrium constant and entropy change

Like the Van't Hoff equation, which relates change in enthalpy to equilibrium constant, is there a similar equation for the relation between change in entropy and equilibrium constant? Consider the ...
2
votes
3answers
954 views

How to explain disagreement between Le Châtelier's principle and the simplified Gibbs free energy equation?

For example, for the dissolution of a salt in water that is exothermic, heating the solution would drive the reaction towards the solid form of the salt according to Le Châtelier's principle. However,...
2
votes
1answer
303 views

Gibbs Free Energy Notation

What's the difference between $G$, $\Delta G$, $\Delta G^\circ$, and $\Delta_\mathrm r G^\circ$? I've seen the first two used interchangably, and seen $G$ specifically referred to as change in Gibbs ...