Questions tagged [elements]

A pure chemical substance consisting of a unique type of atom with a distinguished by its atomic mass.

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Can rays be considered a type of "element"? [closed]

First of all, I hardly know any chemistry, so let's get that out of the way. I have been wondering lately, from a "common sense" point of view (owing to my lack of knowledge), that since air cannot ...
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How can scientists measure the electron affinity and the ionization energy of an element? [closed]

I am pretty curious about the method that the scientists use to measure the electron affinity and the ionization energy of an element. If someone knows about it, please tell me.
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How right is defining elements with the number of protons? [closed]

Atomic number is the number of protons a certain atom has. It's the defining attribute of a certain element. But, How right is that? From the viewpoint of chemistry, the definition is right. Because, ...
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Why is a temporary name given to an element with an atomic number above 100?

All the elements with an atomic number more than 100 are given temporary names by IUPAC according to nomenclature rules. For example, element 101 was temporarily named "Unnilunium" until they give it ...
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Why is UuX used as a symbol for unnamed elements on the periodic table?

Until recently, the last few elements on the periodic table had the chemical symbols (now they have formal chemical symbols!): Uub, Uut, Uuq, Uup, Uuh, Uus, and Uuo Why did they have these temporary ...
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What metal is under the stainless layer when it wears of?

I have this belt for several years now and the belt buckle is naturally subject to wear and tear. On the most exposed spots the outer layer is now completely worn of and I wonder Is this an example ...
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Island of Stability - Why not smash massive elements?

Why haven't scientists (or at least any reports of scientists) smash really heavy stable (or stable-enough) massive elements to produce heavier elements in the proposed island of stability? Not being ...
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Is consumption of chlorine, like fluorine, harmful to bones? [closed]

Is consumption of chlorine harmful to bones ? I know fluorine consumed with water can cause fluorosis to bones and joints. Can chlorine, a similar halogen like fluorine, also cause damage to bones ...
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Whats the difference between 2O and O2 [duplicate]

I just saw something in a chemistry lesson what got me confused. What is the difference between $\ce{2O}$ and $\ce{O2}$? Thanks for the help!
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Is copper an element or molecule? [closed]

I am not sure is copper present in form of molecules? Can someone please describe about it? I searched on Internet and also asked many people but am not getting any clear answer.
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Bonding of Lithium and Argon

I saw a meme that was joking around about Lithium and Argon bonding (see pic below). It got me wondering: Can Lithium and Argon bond in any circumstance?
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Can you combine elemental gold and boron?

Is it possible to combine gold and boron to form compounds? A simple example being: $$ \ce{Au + B -> AuB} $$
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Why don't decomposition reactions form pure elements as products?

For example, if I had a reaction like this: $$ \ce{NaHCO3 -> Na2CO3 + H2O + CO2} $$ Why does it not break down all the way down to its elements? What makes it form such "intermediate" products, ...
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Why is gold so popular in nanotechnology?

Gold is a very popular metal in nanotechnology. It is often used as a substrate in electronic applications, as a core of functionalized nanoparticles, and more. Why is gold so attractive? Why are ...
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When was the symbol for potassium changed from Ka to K?

Wikipedia says that Ka was a symbol for potassium once. Current symbol is K. Name changed due to a standardization of, modernization of, or update to older formerly-used symbol. When was the ...
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Can alkenes have triple bonds?

Or is it characteristic of alkynes only ? also, can they (the alkenes) have double and triple bonds in the same molecule ?
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Molecular structure of all periodic table element molecules exceptional cases etc [closed]

I am searching about some basics in chemistry. I was looking for the molecular structure of all periodic table element molecules. eg: Hydrogen molecule: as $\ce{H2}$; structure: I was able to find out ...
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Evaporating water from a combination of dietary minerals: will it work safely or react?

I've combined multiple elements dissolved in water into a preferred ratio, but would like to evaporate some of the water to increase the concentration (let's say at 200 $^{\circ}\mathrm{C}$ in the ...
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What is the difference between strontium-86 and strontium-90?

I know that strontium ($\ce{Sr^90})$ has a higher mass number than its counterpart, but strontium ($\ce{Sr^86}$) is non-radioactive and not deadly to humans. What makes $\ce{Sr^90}$ so different ...
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Does the mass of sulfur really decrease when dissolved in water and increase when burnt?

I was going through a bunch of interesting science 'facts' and one entry went this way: Name an element whose mass decreases when it is dissolved in water and increases if it is burnt. I tried ...
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Why do the names of most chemical elements end with -um or -ium?

Why do the names of most chemical elements end with -um or -ium for both primordial and synthetic elements?
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1answer
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Why are some elements more abundant than others in the universe?

Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. But what makes it so? At the time of big bang, what made certain elements more abundant than the others? I don't find this order of abundance ...
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Electronic configuration of uranium

I read that the electronic configuration of uranium is [Rn] 5f³ 6d¹ 7s² . Given that the subshells fill in the order 5f --> 6d, why is the 5f subshell only partially filled? Why do electrons fill ...
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When, how & why do atoms become stable. If they're always bonding, do pure elements even exist in the real world? What happens to unstable atoms? [closed]

I really can't get my head around the fact that an element has to always become stable by bonding. Doesn't that mean that you can't actually find a pure element, and that it doesn't exist in it's true ...
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Why does elemental Iodine form a brown solution with Ethanol but not with Isopropyl alcohol?

Although it is not the standard procedure for making iodine solution, I have dissolves pure Iodine granules in Ethanol to produce a brown solution which will produce a positive test for starch by ...
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How was the diatomic nature of many common gaseous elements originally determined?

How did scientists find out that $\ce{Cl2, H2, O2}$ atoms have a two-atomic molecular structure ?
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Why is osmium the densest known element?

Why is osmium so dense despite there being heavier elements after it in the periodic table?
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Element Song, updated with 118 names? [closed]

Tom Lehrer’s The Elements song (listen) mentions all elements up to Nobelium, and ends with the appology These are the only ones of which the news has come to Harvard, And there may be many ...
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Is there a compound or element with properties similar to H2O? [closed]

Is there an existing compound or element with properties similar to H2O? ( Liquid, non toxic, stable, and with a clear / blue coloration ) I would expect that any such element or compound would not ...
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Meaning of m2 in the symbol for an isotope of an element

What does the notation $^{197\mathrm{m}2}\ce{Pb}$ mean? Specifically, the '$\mathrm{m}$2' part. I've found this and it appears to have something to do with charge distribution. The original notation ...
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What element is/used to be called Fb? [closed]

What element used to be called Fb? It was supposedly found in a meteorite in Antarctica and I can't find any references of it.
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Periodic table groups - which grouping is "right"? [closed]

In searching online, I've noticed there are a lot of different ways to group the elements of the periodic table. Take mercury in the two tables linked below, for example: http://i.telegraph.co.uk/...
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Which elements can be diatomic?

Which elements can be diatomic and why? Motivation Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen and the Halogens tend to be thermodynamically stable as a diatomic molecule at room temperature, and are usually ...
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Storage of the Halogens in PTFE Bottles

I'm looking to buy some Iodine for various reactions, and noticed that the person who sells it has it in a glass jar with a plastic lid of unknown type. I'm looking up chemical resistance charts and ...
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Do non-English speaking countries use the same element symbols?

The question does sound pretty absurd, but hear me out first. The Periodic Table of the Elements, as I know it, is supposed to be a common standard adopted by the global scientific community. However,...
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Do the compounds in a chemical equation need a net charge of zero when predicting reaction products?

For predicting reaction products in chemical equations, I am not sure of what the subscripts would look like in the product side. I know the types of reactions, but when you predict the products, do ...
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What is the most stable oxide of Fr?

I read that the heavier alkali metals, like K, Rb, and Cs all prefer to form superoxides. Since Fr is the heaviest alkali metal, I assumed it would follow the same trend as the previous alkali metals, ...
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Calculating the electrons an atom wants to gain/lose to reach a noble gas

I'm trying to understand ions. From what I understand, an ion is when the atom gains or loses electrons. More electrons means it is negatively charged (anion). Less electrons means it is positively ...
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What elements (in the pure form) would harm a human, if eaten? [closed]

What pure elements, if we eat it in a relatively small dose (around a piece of sugar), can be harmful/lethal for an average human? Is, for example, eating pure carbon bad for the organism?
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Macgyvering a Spectroscope

I am currently playing a dungeons and dragons campaign in which there are some new elements. My party, being the nerds that we are, is looking to experiment with them and attempt to discover new ones ...
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Why isn't CO2 flammable? [closed]

Given that $\ce{CO2}$ is comprised of carbon and oxygen, why isn't it a flammable gas?
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How to balance chemical equations with polyatomic ions [closed]

I know that you can not split poly-atomic ions but I am confused on how to balance the following equation: 9PbSO4 -> 10PBSO3 + 3O2 Pb = 9 Pb = 10 S = 9 S = 10 O = 36 O = 36 Obviously the ...
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Feasibility of using Magnesium, Beryllium, Lithium as light sources?

First off, I'm asking this for worldbuilding purposes, so don't worry, nobody will get hurt ;) Magnesium, Beryllium and Lithium burn relatively bright. If they are somehow thinned out in some other ...
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Are there natural or artificial enzymes that break down metals?

Do natural or human engineered enzymes exist that can speed up the break down metals (element, compounds & alloys)? If no, then what biological or chemical construct can break down metals in the ...
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If you put two blocks of an element together, why don't they bond?

Say you have two lumps or blocks of an element, like lithium for example, say in the form of two bars. Why, when you bring the two bars together so that they touch each other, do they not instantly ...
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Why do osmium and iridium have the most oxidation states of all the elements?

Both osmium and iridium have 12 oxidation states. Indeed, iridium has the highest oxidation state of all elements at +9. see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_oxidation_states_of_the_elements I'...
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Relativistic effects in element 137 (Feinmanium) and above

Here I saw that if an element above atomic no 137 has to exist, it must have electron speed greater than speed of light. My question is , has this calculation been done keeping in mind Einstein's ...
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Metallic properties of iodine [closed]

Why does iodine exhibit metallic properties at room temperature although being a non-metal? Are there any similar elements like this?
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Discovery of elements

How did the first chemists know that a sample contained so and so elements? If they tried to find through reactions,they should know what elements make up the other reactant(s), and how it reacts ...
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Is ozone really a chemical element? [closed]

In our chemistry book is written that ozone ($\ce{O3}$) is a chemical element. Also our chemistry book gives a definition that agrees with that. But our teacher doesn't agree. His reasons: If ...