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Questions tagged [electrostatic-energy]

Electrostatic potential energy is created based on the law of electrostatic attraction and repulsion, or Coulomb's Law. It describes the force exerted on a charged object(e.g.electron) due to the presence of another charged object (e.g.nucleus).

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What's the most up to date explanation for the stability of high multiplicity states?

"However, accurate quantum-mechanical calculations (starting in the 1970s)... singly occupied orbitals are less effectively screened or shielded from the nucleus, so that such orbitals contract ...
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What happens during electromigration in low concentration electrolytes?

I'm not sure if my understanding is correct, please correct me if there is something wrong. Considering a 2 electrodes system with a constant voltage applied between both electrodes and with no ...
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How can I calculate the electrostatic energy between two fragments?

I have a 2-fragment molecular complex with partial charge transfer from fragment 1 to fragment 2. The binding energy is ~0.3 eV and I want to evaluate what fraction comes from electrostatic attraction....
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Watercolor pigment conundrum - can a change in ionic profile induce flocculation?

A client of mine has installed an ion exchange water purifier to de-harden her tap water. After that, however, she noticed that it has negatively affected her watercolor painting. From what she ...
Alex's user avatar
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Explanation for the low melting point of zinc nitrate in terms of its lattice energy and electrostatic interactions?

I understand that ionic compounds tend to have higher melting points, but I was surprised to see zinc nitrate having an unusually low melting point. I tried understanding it in terms of lattice energy ...
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Why does NaCl form when it requires 1.52 eV of energy? [closed]

An atom of sodium has one 3s electron outside a closed shell, and it takes 5.14 eV of energy to remove that electron. The chlorine lacks one electron to fill a shell, and releases 3.62 eV when it ...
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Equilibrium Bond Length & Diatomic Molecules

Must every diatomic molecule always have an equilibrium bond length? That is, is there always a distance between two nuclei such that the Coulomb attraction between the electron and protons ...
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Photoelectric effect: What happens when you irradiate the metal strip with a wave of frequency exactly equal to threshold frequency of the metal?

My teacher said that if we irradiate the metal strip (used in generating the photoelectric effect) with light having frequency equal to the metal's threshold frequency, then the electrons will have ...
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Calculating the net charge of DNA oligo

How can I calculate the net charge of a DNA oligo? I have a bunch of different sized oligos (vary from 9 to 50nt long) which I am using for microscopy (DNA-PAINT) and I need to know their charges ...
de la Tour's user avatar
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Gibbs energy of electron transfer

The reaction Gibbs free energy of a cell is $\Delta_\mathrm{r}G^\circ = -nFE^\circ, \tag{1}$ and the Gibbs energy of photoinduced electron transfer according to IUPAC is $$\Delta_\mathrm{ET}G^\circ = ...
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How do electrostatic effects effect facial selectivity in addition to cyclic oxo-carbeniums?

I was reviewing Dave Evans' notes for stereochemistry of C=X electrophile additions, and found this slide detailing differences in additions to cyclic oxo-carbenium electrophiles, but I don't ...
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charge density as a measure of lattice enthalpy & polarizing power?

My official CIE A level textbook, and some mark schemes mention the following: Ions with the same charge have a lower charge density if their radius is large. This is because the same charge is ...
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Solving detergent powder in a solution

I used a detergent powder mixed with water to clean my espresso machine. Some micro particles of powder are stuck into machine's inner tank. So when I pull the hot water out of the machine's nozzle, ...
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Is it possible to calculate electrostatic interactions using QM methods?

I'm trying to calculate an accurate electrostatic repulsion (and possibly attraction) energy term for various small molecules, using Quantum Mechanics (QM) methods. These may include molecules such as ...
Astronomer's user avatar
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Textbook Claim: "... in all cases it is the electrostatic force acting between charged particles that is responsible for all the forms of bonding." [duplicate]

I am reading an introductory semiconductor physics textbook. The textbook states the following: Several types of atomic bonding have been identified, including ionic, covalent, van der Waals, ...
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How hydrogen molecule is formed? [closed]

How two hydrogen atoms come close to form a bond ? Textbooks refer to a potential energy diagram but what i cant understand is what is this potential energy if the atoms are neutral . How they come ...
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Total SCF Energy with Pseudopotentials

Is there a physical meaning to the SCF energy of a molecule obtained using pseudopotentials to represent the core electrons of heavy atoms (for example gold)? I've been running calculations in ...
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Static electricity with calcium carbonate particles

We are working with small calcium carbonate particles (microfossils) but one of the problems is they stick to the plastic or metal tools we are using, presumably due to static charge. For example, ...
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Does electrostatic polarity in aluminum or alcohol based dye affect adhesion. If so, what would encourage the best adhesion?

I am trying to find the best method to encourage adhesion of a wood alcohol based dye to 6061 aluminum. The results I have gotten have generally been a somewhat blotchy appearance, and a uniform ...
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Can anyone explain this condensation pattern?

What is the hair-like polymer that condenses on the caps of the plastic cell vial? Inside vial are cells in a mixture of FBS and DMSO. The vials were frozen slowly in a special isopropanol-filled ...
user36181's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
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How to know which ionic compound have the highest lattice energy without knowing the values of the radii?

Given two ionic compounds, for instance: $$\ce{CaS} \quad \mathrm{or} \quad \ce{KCl}$$ What is the procedure to predict which of the two have the highest lattice energy (in absolute value)? (...
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How does binding energy "manifest" itself? [closed]

The concept of binding energy is, that it is equal to the energy that is needed to separate atoms in a covalent bond. I think I have understood that. The electrostatic powers between the atoms create ...
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Coulomb force and potential energy in water vs vacuum

If you have 2 ions of equal but opposite charge, will the force between them be larger in a vacuum and smaller in water? Would this be because the relative permittivity of water is greater than 1 (...
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Dielectric constant and dissolution of ionic salts

We say that salts like $\ce{NaCl}$ get easily dissolved in water because the dielectric constant of water is very high. I know the dielectric constant of water is 81 and if a salt is put into water ...
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Recommendations for electrostatic potential surfaces

Are there standards for density cutoffs, colours and colour mappings for electrostatic potential surfaces? I observe that people use many different values. For instance, this article (in Fig. 1a) ...
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Difference between polarizability and dipole moment? [duplicate]

In my head, any molecule that is very polarisable, has a dipole moment. Is this true? I am very confused and can't seem to find anything that helps my thought, and I can't seem to distinguish between ...
Michael Nguyen's user avatar
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How is it possible to get an attractive charge-dipole interaction using the modified Coulomb law?

Vqµ = − qµ / (4π ε0εr r2) Say you had a negative charge, interacting with the positive end of a dipole then the charge would be -1.602 x 10-19 C and the dipole moment would always be a positive value....
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Does Chemical Formula of Matter Influence on how would it be Charged?

Firstly: Suppose we rub glass ($\ce{SiO2}$) against paper (which is made from cellulose $\ce{(C6H10O5)_{$n$}}$). We receive positively charged glass and negatively charged paper. Is that because of ...
Artur's user avatar
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How to eliminate electrostatic charges from titanium dioxide powder

I have synthesized $\ce{TiO2}$ nanoparticles via sol-gel method and I need to calcine it at elevated temperatures for the crystal phases formation. The powder is very highly charged and not only ...
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Hamiltonian for a two electron system

What is the hamiltonian for an atom with two electrons and a nuclear charge $Z$? The Hamiltonian always takes the general form: $\hat H=\hat T + \hat V $ The kinetic energy of each of the electrons ...
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Is there a specific chemical property or concept that explains/predicts the triboelectric series?

Is there a chemical property (perhaps electron affinity?) that can be used to predict where a substance would fall in a triboelectric series such as this one? Or would the cause of the charge ...
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Why does attraction always cause release of energy making the system more stable?

Suppose $\ce{Na^+}$ and $\ce{Cl^-}$ form an ionic bond. In doing so they will come closer by attraction. Now as they come closer their speed will increase and hence the kinetic energy increases. So ...
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Physical significance of double-well potential in quantum bonding

I'm currently studying about the hydrogen bond's Potential Energy Surface (PES) pattern. As per literature, single point energy obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) using MP2 approximation ...
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Significance of single point energy when calculating interaction energies

I am currently investigating about the interaction behavior of a few atoms in certain conditions. Is it possible to use the concept of single point energy to represent the atomic interaction energies ...
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3 answers
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How is drift due to static electricity eliminated from an analytical balance?

I've recently encountered a problem when using an analytical (0.1 mg accuracy) scale to determine the mass of a sample of ferrocene powder. The reading in the balance seems to drift either upwards or ...
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Why is the ionization energy for Hydrogen non-zero?

There are no other electrons to collide, repel and kick Hydrogen's single electron to a distant nucleus. And that a single electron is tightly attracted to the nucleus by the electrostatic energy ...
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