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Questions tagged [conductivity]

A material's ability to conduct electric current or thermal energy by any means.

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27
votes
1answer
14k views

Electrical conductivity of graphite

On this Wikipedia page, the electrical conductivity of various materials are given in the third column ($\sigma \text{ (S/m) at 20}^\circ \text{C}$). I am interested in the entry for Carbon (graphite)...
19
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3answers
2k views

Conductivity as a function of acid concentration

I have conducted an experiment measuring the conductivity of both hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid in solution respectively, with varying concentration. Wikipedia as well as a question on the site ...
11
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4answers
297 views

Is there any electronic component to water conductivity?

Answers to Decrease in temperature of a aqueous salt solution decreases conductivity indicate that the electrical conductivity of salt solutions arises from the mobility of ionic species and therefore ...
8
votes
1answer
267 views

How strict is the “to excite electrons the energy must equal the energy state difference” fact?

We are always told that to excite an electron from one state to a higher energy states, for example from the valance band to the conduction band, the energy must equal the energy difference between ...
2
votes
2answers
19k views

Graphene Vs Copper?

I was wondering about the amazing conductive properties of graphene, lets assume a large copper bar that is 10 kg, current of 1kA and probably more can flow in it, what about graphene? It certainly ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Conductivity of water and chlorine?

I am a novice in chemistry and i have a question: I know that water is not a good conductive material (since there is a perfect bond in water I think) but I am thinking that if we add chlorine which ...
15
votes
1answer
391 views

How does conductivity work for non-redoxed ions?

Related (very similar, but here I want a mechanism) https://physics.stackexchange.com/q/21827/7433 By the Kohlrausch law, all ions contribute to the conductivity of an electrolyte. Now, as I ...
12
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4answers
5k views

Does an electrically conductive gas exist at room conditions?

As I know, the gases are insulators, because their particles are mainly electrically neutral, and thus there is no movable charges in them. But maybe it shouldn't be always so, for example if a gas ...
10
votes
1answer
322 views

Does the delocalization of p-orbitals ensure conductivity?

For example, polyacetylene is a conjugated system, i.e. with de-localized p-orbitals, but accroding to Chiang et. al. (1977) polyacetylene is semiconducting, and becomes conductive only when doped ...
5
votes
1answer
730 views

Formation of Bands in Semi-Conductors

At school, we are learning about semi-conductors and their applications in modern electronics. One of the features of semi-conductors is that there is a small energy gap between the valence and ...
3
votes
1answer
114 views

Would a quarternary ammonium electride conduct electricity?

If suppose, I crystallised a quarternary ammonium electride could this conduct electricity similar to a metallic conductor? Metals have lattice atoms as charged metal ions are a sea of electrons. This ...
10
votes
2answers
13k views

Why is copper a better conductor than iron?

So metals are good conductors as the electron in their outer shell is loose and can plunge out of the atom with the application of the slightest force(voltage). Silver is the best metallic conductor, ...
5
votes
3answers
14k views

What is the difference between molar conductance and molar conductivity?

I'm learning (or at least trying to learn) about electrochemistry, but a major obstacle to that, is that different books I refer use different terms for the same symbols. So in a last ditch attempt to ...
5
votes
2answers
407 views

Decrease in temperature of a aqueous salt solution decreases conductivity

Why does the conductivity of a water solution drop as the temperature decreases? How are these two related?
1
vote
1answer
866 views

How is solid titanium(II) oxide an electrical conductor?

Most salts in the solid state are electrical insulators, since the ions are not mobile (e.g. sodium chloride). However, solid titanium(II) oxide, $\ce{TiO (s)}$, is a conductor. How is this so?