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Questions tagged [combustion]

For questions about the combustion of an organic molecule or inorganic substance. Do not use this tag if your question is about the [stoichiometry] of a combustion reaction, or for the calculations of [thermodynamics] functions (like enthalpy change).

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Why isn't NO considered combustible?

According to this (and a bunch of other sources), NO (nitric oxide) is not combustible. But that same source says NO rapidly reacts with O2 to produce NO2, which I thought was the definition of ...
unstable's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
551 views

Waste Products from Hydrogen Fuel Cells

I was recently reading this article by BMW, that said The exhaust air of a hydrogen car consists of pure water vapor. The fuel cell drive is therefore locally emission-free. This means it keeps the ...
Ronith's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Does pressure affect the enthalpy of formation?

In a complete combustion reaction, coal and air (both at $300K$ and $2$ atm) react to produce carbon dioxide which exits the reactor at the same temperature and pressure as it entered. $$\mathbf{C+O_2}...
Eric Brown's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
36 views

Is HCl in salt form reactive with metallized aluminium plastic film? [closed]

I’m in the process of packaging an amino acid that contains HCl in salt form. The mixture is 60% base and 40% HCl salt. Will this react to metallized aluminium plastic?
user144358's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
134 views

Purpose of sulphuric acid in archaic matchboxes

The first attempts at instantaneous matchboxes usually included some sort of oxidizer, usually potassium chlorate and an initiating fuel (first sugar was used then they moved on to $\ce{Sb2S3}$ etc.) ...
Gaurav Sai Maddipati's user avatar
-3 votes
2 answers
83 views

Is it possible to filter CO2? [closed]

I'm diving into the world of chemistry here, pondering a concept that might sound a bit out there. Can we actually filter out CO2 from a car's exhaust pipe and store it until it's safe to handle? This ...
Dino 's user avatar
  • 29
6 votes
1 answer
509 views

"Fireblob" in KO₂ and PCl₅ reaction

The reaction between $\ce{KO2(s)}$ and $\ce{PCl5(s)}$ leads to the strange formation of a black "fireblob" which eventually turns orange. This is demonstrated in this YouTube video (...
TheSimpliFire's user avatar
-5 votes
2 answers
300 views

How do I calculate the fuel consumption inside a cylinder-piston stoichiometrically?

Consider I have car 4-cylinders with total cylinder capacity is 1,496cc. Per piston, the cylinder is 374cc. The piston diameter is 72.5mm, height=90.6mm, and compression ratio is 11.5:1. Hence we may ...
AirCraft Lover's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Specific temperature ranges of kinetic combustion mechanisms

Do kinetic combustion mechanisms typically operate within specific temperature ranges? I tested some mechanisms from the scientific literature, and apparently they were only working at temperatures ...
Somestudent01's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
61 views

Can this equation be balanced using ion-electron method?

Reaction: $\ce{C2H4 + O2 → CO2 + H2O}$ I want to balance the above reaction using the ion-electron method. My attempt: Ox-half: $\ce{C2^(^-^2^)H4 + 4H2O → 2C^(^+^4^)O2 + 12H^+ +12e^-}$ Red-half: $\ce{...
Ayush Naman's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
875 views

Why is coal and charcoal a good fuel, but not graphite?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but coal(after coking) and charcoal are essentially hard dry lumps of pure carbon. But of course so is graphite. I understand of course the structure is different lending them ...
Demiurge777's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
25 views

Exothermic Rapid Multistage Reactions

I asked a similar question on SpaceExploration, but I think it might be better answered here: Most chemical reactions in rocket combustion sequences are fairly simple, even with "exotic" ...
Anti Elon Guy's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
80 views

Combustion of organic materials in oxygen-18

Suppose I have some material that came from or was made from a plant or animal. I will assume that its molecular structure, along with carbon, will contain some oxygen as well as other elements. If I ...
stan sheldon's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
89 views

Risk of spontaneous combustion with cedarwood oil

Is there a risk of spontaneous combustion of cedarwood oil used with rattan diffuser reeds as in the photograph at the bottom? An NFPA safety sheet talks about the risk of spontaneous combustion of &...
Bolio's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
79 views

Creating a Simplified Model for Temperature Change in Auto-Ignition of A4 Office Paper [closed]

When paper reached a certain temperature, auto-ignition occurs, and then there is a process that makes the temperature rise to around 1000 to 1500 Celsius degrees. How can I make a simplified model ...
LaTap's user avatar
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-3 votes
1 answer
75 views

Can someone help me with the experimental tabulation or spread sheet data on enthalpy, temperature, and pressure for aluminum and oxygen combustion [closed]

I need an experimental tabulation or spread sheet data of enthalpy, temperature, and pressure tabulated in columns for aluminum and oxygen combustion under non standard conditions. Any references to ...
Martins's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
124 views

Chemical species equations in a kinetic mechanism of combustion

In combustion, for a kinetic mechanism involving $m$ reactions and $n$ chemical species, of the form \begin{align} \begin{cases} \nu_{11}' \mathcal{S}_1 + \nu_{12}' \mathcal{S}_2 + \dots + ...
Somestudent01's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
2k views

Striking back of Bunsen burner

I have a question about striking back of Bunsen burner, regarding the reaction between methane and oxygen. When methane gas reacts with oxygen completely, a clean non-luminous blue flame can be ...
Chemistry student's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
337 views

What range of relative humidity is present in the combustion byproducts of a natural gas stove, immediately after combustion?

If I have a traditional gas range-top, burning natural gas (instead of LPG or propane), what is the typical range of humidity present in the combustion byproducts immediately above the flame? The ...
Kenn Sebesta's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
797 views

Flash point of naptha and propanol

I filled a Zippo lighter with 2-propanol and it lit up easily when the ambient temperature was around 6-7 degrees Celsius. It was impossible to light it up when the temperature was around 3-4 degrees ...
flappix's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
46 views

Combustion of Sodium (Na) Metal in presence of Excess Air [duplicate]

There was a question which I was recently solving regarding the products formed after combustion of Sodium Metal in presence of Excess Air. The given answers were Na2O2 (sodium peroxide) and Na2O (...
Hydro_7's user avatar
  • 91
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

How does burning natural gas produce nitrogen oxides?

I understand that the byproducts of burning methane to be carbon dioxide and water, and in low oxygen situations, carbon monoxide. $\ce{CH4 + 2 O2 -> CO2 + 2 H2O}$ $\ce{2 CH4 + O2 -> 2 CO + 4 H2}...
rtaft's user avatar
  • 113
3 votes
0 answers
49 views

How stable are paper book matches?

I have few hundred paper book match books that I collected about 25 to 45 years ago when many businesses had them custom printed. They are from around the world although mostly US. They are in an open ...
blacksmith37's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
56 views

When hydrogen and oxygen reacts, what defines if it will turn into hydrogen peroxide or water?

If you have a jar with oxygen and hydrogen inside, I'm interested in knowing what variables are most important to ensure that the mixture will become water (if that was the goal) or hydrogen peroxide, ...
m-a-r-c-e-l-i-n-o's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
174 views

Are solid fuels with calorific values >= 10,000 kcal/kg (42 MJ/kg) physically possible?

I have seen laboratory documentation from a reputable lab in southeast Asia that a company has achieved a solid fuel product made from landfill material with a high heating calorific value ($CV$) of ...
Hendrix13's user avatar
  • 490
-3 votes
2 answers
111 views

Is there an intuitive answer why burning is very exothermic? [closed]

Water and carbon dioxide are much lower in energy than hydrocarbon and oxygen. Is there an intuitive answer for this? Is this because atom arrangements that have more polar bonds tend to be lower in ...
Bohan Xu's user avatar
  • 199
2 votes
1 answer
275 views

What chemicals can remove or greatly reduce the smell of burning diesel fuel?

I am not a chemist myself but I am trying to solve a practical problem I am experiencing. I have a nicely working diesel stove but it produces some smell. I've read that adding urea to the exhaust may ...
Boris D. Teoharov's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
165 views

How can combusted methane from landfill samples be quantified?

Background: For my studies I'm wanting and attempting to make a landfill greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) model that predicts the amount of greenhouse gas equivalent emissions ($GHG_\mathrm{eq}$ [tonnes/...
Hendrix13's user avatar
  • 490
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

Does stoichiometric gas mixture produce the highest explosion pressure (or energy) compared with other explosive limit mixture?

I understand that a stoichiometric mixture contains a balanced mixture of air and fuel and both fuel and air are completed consumed. For example, the ideal stoichiometric mixture for propane is ...
William Chao's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
298 views

What's the stoichiometric ratio of Kerosene to a mixture of 50% water and 50% hydrogen peroxide [closed]

So I'm wanting to do some testing with combustion of certain liquids, and I'd like to know what the right ratio is for these liquids. What I'm going to be using is regular kerosene (NOT RP-1) and 50% ...
Kale's user avatar
  • 1
6 votes
2 answers
461 views

Equilibrium constant vs Reaction rate constant

For a reaction, e.g., $$a X + b Y → c Z$$ Its reaction rate constant is $${\displaystyle r=k_f(T)[\mathrm {X} ]^{m}[\mathrm {Y} ]^{n}}$$ where the exponents m and n are called partial orders of ...
ubuntu_noob's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
69 views

What happened after fire finished burning? [closed]

After fire finished burning, did it merge with the atmosphere and becoming water vapors, oxygen and nitrogen, or did it simply disappear into nothing?
SnoopyKid's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

Understanding Hydrocarbon Combustion [duplicate]

First ... I know almost nothing about chemistry. So, for the past week or so, I've kind of been fascinated with this whole combustion thing (not in an evil way, of course). So, I've been reading, and ...
Kerry Thomas's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

What compounds smell like burning rubber or tar?

Background: A couple of friends of mine live next door to each other in a 10-year old block of flats in London, UK. They say that in the early hours of the morning, a toxic smell appears in their ...
Rocketmagnet's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
24 views

Aproximation of H2 combusion limits

I'm looking for a relatively simple approximation for combustibility limits of H2/O2/N2 gas mixtures over temperature/pressure. (It doesn't need to be conservative.) I've found a fair bit of data for ...
TLW's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
0 answers
44 views

Understanding uni- and termolecular reactions in combustion kinetics

I'm trying to understand and incorporate 9-species 19-reaction H2/O2 combustion mechanism into my numerical solver. The reaction mechanism in question is O'Conaire. It seems that the paper is in some ...
omican's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
0 answers
36 views

Could perchlorate salts allow for underwater combustion?

So apparently perchlorate salts can act as oxidizers for combustion (basically they can replace oxygen in the fire triangle, at least I think), and the reason why you can't have a fire underwater is ...
Dromeoraptor pennato's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
113 views

Are carbon nanotubes and graphene very flammable?

The reason I ask is because carbon is quite flammable in virtually every shape we encounter in nature. Even diamonds burn as a matter of fact. And after I just saw some steel wool burn easily, I ...
Joey Joystick's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
115 views

Is it possible to modify how energy is released in the combustion of a fuel like methane? [closed]

From what I understand (please correct me if I'm wrong), combustion is an exothermic oxidation reaction where, for example, a fuel like methane is combined with oxygen, i.e. CH4 + 2O2 → CO2 + 2H2O. My ...
JBaczuk's user avatar
  • 111
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why would tellurium + sodium hydroxide have worked as a good anti-knock gasoline additive (if it wasn't so smelly)?

The April 22, 2022 Veritasium video The Man Who Accidentally Killed The Most People In History mentions several aspects of the historical use of tetra-ethyl lead in gasoline, the resulting widespread ...
uhoh's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
101 views

What is the most stable cycloalkene? [closed]

I'm looking specifically at cyclopentene and cyclohexene. Supposedly, greater instability would lead to a more exothermic enthalpy of combustion. However, based on my data, cyclopentene is more ...
Evan's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
46 views

Origin of oxygen content among the products of burned carbohydrates

For simplicity, I am only considering complete combustion. I am ignoring variants such as deoxyribose, just pure carbohydrates. Balancing the equation is easy due to the definition of carbohydrate: we ...
badjohn's user avatar
  • 828
1 vote
0 answers
66 views

How much heat is exchanged by this system?

I am having trouble with the following question: We allow $\pu{18 g}$ of oxygen to react with $\pu{23 g}$ of ethane. The reaction is shown below. Since the heat of combustion of ethane is $\pu{-1560 ...
Ethan's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
1 answer
71 views

How holes in cooking burner help it to perform complete combution but candle thread can't by providing sufficient oxygen supply?

Recently I was introduced to organic chemistry for the first time. In the section of complete and incomplete combustion of carbon compounds, they provide example of two different objects, namely a ...
Anshika singh's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
258 views

Do molecules containing enough oxygen to burn themselves exist?

Is there a molecule with enough oxygen in it (for example, something like $\ce{HCOOOH}$) such that it can undergo complete combustion without requiring any additional oxygen? For example the above ...
Bruce M's user avatar
  • 171
3 votes
0 answers
84 views

Is the activation energy higher in incomplete combustion or in complete combustion?

I am looking into high school level chemistry where it is asked if the incomplete combustion of methane into carbon monoxide has a higher activation energy then its complete combustion. My reasoning ...
Yunus King's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
2k views

Where does the energy from combustion come from?

I am aware that combustion reactions are exothermic. The energy stored in the chemical bonds of the products is less than the energy stored in the chemical bonds of the reactants. The difference in ...
Bruno Nowak's user avatar
18 votes
3 answers
3k views

What is going on in and below a yellow or blue gas flame?

Unsure if this is more chemistry or physics, but here goes... Consider a Bunsen burner and the flame it produces when the air inlets are closed vs open. According to the description on the linked ...
Anthony X's user avatar
  • 425
1 vote
3 answers
160 views

Does smoking drugs degrade them?

Why doesn't smoking a drug degrade or destroy it? A wide variety of psychoactive compounds ("drugs") are commonly consumed via smoking – e.g., nicotine, THC, amphetamines, cocaine, and DMT. ...
feetwet's user avatar
  • 3,340
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

Why do hydrocarbons give out a blue flame on complete combustion? [duplicate]

In complete combustion of hydrocarbons the colour of the flame is blue. But what is the reason behind the flame being blue and not green or black or any other colour? Edit: I've searched the web for ...
Pumpkin_Star's user avatar

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