Linked Questions

2
votes
0answers
89 views

Can two metals bond covalently? [duplicate]

Can metal ions be engineered to behave like non-metals in terms of chemical properties (by supplying or removing electrons), would the altered metal ions bond covalently? Would the ions be too ...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

What makes a metal more inclined to bond covalently? [duplicate]

Many metals form compounds with s-block elements that are essentially entirely ionic. However, elements like silver, copper, lithium and so on, can form bonds that are significantly covalent in ...
8
votes
2answers
52k views

Is aluminium a metal or metalloid?

Aluminium is along the dark line of the Periodic Table and it is $p$-block metal. Is it metal or a metalloid? Why?
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Do metals form covalent bonds besides ionic and cordinate bond? [closed]

My chemistry textbook says that metals form ionic or cordinate bonds whereas non metals form covalent bonds. But in another textbook I read that Lithium, Beryllium, Aluminium, Chromium, Manganese etc, ...
3
votes
2answers
26k views

Bonds between metals and non-metals

My teacher in college says that bonds between metals and nonmetals are ionic. $ \ce{Metal - Metal} $ $\Rightarrow$ Metalic bond $\ce{Non metal - Non metal}$ $\Rightarrow$ Covalent bond I have to ...
17
votes
3answers
2k views

Why does mercury form polycations?

For example, mercury (I) is $\ce{Hg2^2+}$ and not $\ce{Hg+}$. What causes the stability in covalently bonded $\ce{Hg}$ ions?
4
votes
1answer
4k views

Is FeS2 both an ionic and covalent compound? [duplicate]

Iron (II) disulfide. Iron pyrite. Fool's gold to some. But what bond does it fall under? It could possibly be used for both? This would give a deeper understanding into other like examples, where ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Would tin (II) sulfide be considered a covalent network solid?

Considering that tin has a Pauling electronegativity of 1.96 and sulphur 2.58, and that a bond is considered to be ionic with a Pauling EN difference of approx. 1.7 at the least, would tin (II) ...
4
votes
0answers
1k views

Why does Silver form bonds with covalent character?

Compounds of silver form particularly strong bonds which is accounted for by the significant covalent character of the bonding. Furthermore, is the tendency to form covalent bonds linked to the fact ...
-5
votes
3answers
2k views

Is copper an element or molecule? [closed]

I am not sure is copper present in form of molecules? Can someone please describe about it? I searched on Internet and also asked many people but am not getting any clear answer.
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Why does tungsten(VI) oxide have higher melting point than tungsten(VI) fluoride?

I'm learning about ionic bonding and polarizability. Larger anions with higher charge should make more polarized ionic bonds. $\ce{O^2-}$ is both larger and has higher charge than $\ce{F^-}.$ So, why ...