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I'm doing revision questions and want to double check something. The opening information reads:

Two chlorides of iron were prepared. One was prepared by reacting iron with dry chlorine gas. 4.50 g of iron reacted with chlorine gas to produce 13.01 g of the chloride. The other chloride was prepared by reacting iron with dry hydrogen chloride; 2.80 g of iron reacted with hydrogen chloride to produce 6.35 g of the chloride.

The questions are then:

(i) Calculate the mass of iron that reacted with 2.80 g of iron in each chloride.
(ii) Find the ratio of the different masses of chlorine that combined with 2.80 g of iron.
(iii) Which of the chemical combination laws is demonstrated using this data?

Is that first question right? I would've thought they're asking to calculate the mass of chlorine, which you'd simply get by subtracting the mass of reactant iron from the mass of the end product.

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Two chlorides of iron were prepared.

I do not read that as: $\ce{FeCl_{n}}$ was prepared by two different methods, but as:

  1. Reacting iron with dry chlorine gas yields $\ce{FeCl_{n}}$
  2. Reacting iron with hydrogen chloride yields $\ce{FeCl_{m}}$

Apparently, iron is oxidized in both cases.

  • What are the oxidants (what is reduced)?
  • Which of them is the stronger oxidant?
  • What is the stoichiometry (what are n and m)?

Could it be helpful to divide the amount of chloride produced by the amount of iron used? Would different numbers indicate which of the products has a higher chloride content?

(i) Calculate the mass of iron that reacted with 2.80 g of iron in each chloride.

Is it possible that they meant the same as indicated above, i.e.:

Calculate the amount of iron chloride that would have been produced from 2.80 g (instead of 4.50 g) iron in the first experiment and compare with the outcome of the second experiment.

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