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Is it possible to represent Aluminum 6061 (AlMgSiCuCr) as a skeletal formula / structure?

Linear Formula: Al-97.9% Mg-1% Si-0.6% Fe-0.4% Cu-0.28% (possibly helpful)

Here's an example of what I mean...

Example

Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Mithoron, Waylander, Todd Minehardt, aventurin, A.K. Jul 1 '18 at 23:33

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  • $\begingroup$ The ratio between the different elements is a 100% fixed ratio of small integers in an organic molecule like the one you show. $\endgroup$ – Karl Jun 29 '18 at 18:58
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In this case, probably no. When you see copper in aluminum (as in the 6xxx series), it is probably there in small amounts for purposes of precipitation hardening. In this case, there are tiny discrete precipitates of copper alloys or intermetallic compounds finely dispersed throughout the aluminum/silicon matrix.

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No, it is not possible. There is no repeating crystal unit.

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    $\begingroup$ And perhaps even more to the point, 6061 aluminum it is not even a single phase, which is very common for engineering alloys. The (usually) small amounts of second phases are what gives the alloy the desired mechanical properties. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Jun 29 '18 at 14:52
  • $\begingroup$ Is it one of those icosahedral phases I've heard about? $\endgroup$ – Oscar Lanzi Jun 29 '18 at 23:47
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What you need to do is to check the phase diagram for the system, it may be difficult (or impossible) to get a phase diagram where Al, Si, Cu, Mg and Fe can all be varried independently of each other.

But as a start you should look at the Al / Si, Al / Cu, Al / Mg and Al / Fe phase diagrams.

Under some conditions you might have a solid solution of the dopant atoms in aluminium metal as the "solvent", under these conditions you will have a disordered solid in which some aluminium atoms are randomly replaced with things like copper.

I worry that it is not clear if the % of the elements is given in mass (weight) % or atomic %. So I think it makes the question a bit harder to answer. This book chapter may help to make things a bit more clear.

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