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Is there an example of two reactions that catalyze one another? More than two is also helpful, but I guess it will be hard to find one.

By "catalyze one another", I mean that one of the products of the first reaction acts as a catalyst for the second reaction.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Mithoron, airhuff, pentavalentcarbon, NotEvans., Nilay Ghosh Jun 10 '18 at 5:06

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Reactions do not catalyze reactions. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Jun 8 '18 at 10:33
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    $\begingroup$ Could we please reopen this question? It seems pretty clear what the OP is asking. $\endgroup$ – Gaurang Tandon Jun 11 '18 at 10:13
  • $\begingroup$ I agree. There has to be more than the magnesium nitride/boron nitride thing I stumbled upon a while back. $\endgroup$ – Oscar Lanzi Jun 11 '18 at 15:06
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An early synthesis of borazon from hexagonal boron nitride would be one possible example. When other approaches did not work, Robert H. Wentorf Jr. added magnesium and voila! The magnesium had reacted with some of the hexagonal nitride to form $\ce{Mg3N2}$, and the latter then catalyzed the hexagonal to cubic conversion. (Today other methods have taken over.)

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