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I tried to google this but 'element' as a programming term complicated the search.

I'm looking for a site or article that covers how one would find each element in nature, in its most abundant form. For example, what's the best natural source/form of Sulfur? Beryllium? Tugsten? etc.

Any help is appreciated.

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The Wikipedia page for each element is probably the easiest place to start with. If you want some significantly more in-depth data, the USGS publishes free-access mineral commodity summaries on many (but not all) elements, including information about their origin, abundance and applications. Other good sources are books, especially descriptive inorganic chemistry books, such as a few of John Emsley's publications including Nature's Building Blocks and The Elements, as well as many other college-level inorganic chemistry texts.

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The book Chemistry of the Elements by N. N. Greenwood is an absolutely huge handy tome full of information, which is organised by element or clusters of similar elements.

You'll find this as a handy overall chemistry reference, but most common ores of the elements (where applicable) and geological extraction information are also given. An essential to have on any chemistry shelf.

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  • $\begingroup$ .. or any good inorganic chemistry text book (but this is indeed a good book). $\endgroup$ – Greg Aug 20 '14 at 8:51
  • $\begingroup$ From experience, not all inorganic books include the information like this one does. This book is essentially an inorganic textbook and data book at the same time. $\endgroup$ – user7232 Aug 20 '14 at 8:53
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You should try this site. You will need to click on each element to get the information you need.

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http://elements.vanderkrogt.net/index.php is in my opinion the best site about how have been finden and discovered the elements. enter image description here

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http://www.geokem.com/global-element-dist1.html#ge is more specific for your needs,more concise, less history more about actual source of the element. enter image description here

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