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The glass transition temperature is associated with amorphous regions in a polymer. If I have observed in a lab experiment that polymers with a higher glass transition temperature tend to have less crystalline structures, how should I interpret this?

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  • $\begingroup$ Mostly coincidence. It's much more useful to look at and compare specific, comparable examples and explain their actual properties. E.g. the different Tg's and crystallinities of LDPE and HDPE. $\endgroup$ – Karl May 28 '18 at 23:34
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A higher glass transition indicates less energy is required for the bonds of the glass to relax their strain. This is usually due to a slower cooling rate. In a slower cooling rate regime, more time is allowed for crystallization to occur. So while you are correct to observe a correlation, one does not cause the other but rather they have a common cause of the slower cooling rate.

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