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At what numerical values of ε, then what organic compounds if any mark these thresholds. How is that only for a vacuum has ε=1? This is absolute lowest limit?

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  • $\begingroup$ This looks like two separate questions. What does the value of the vacuum have to do with ionic, polar, and non-polar compounds? Any limits on the dielectric constant aren't necessarily related to the classification of a molecule. (I'm not saying this because I know the answer.) $\endgroup$ – pentavalentcarbon May 26 '18 at 0:20
  • $\begingroup$ Related answer: chemistry.stackexchange.com/a/32862/7951 $\endgroup$ – Loong May 26 '18 at 10:50
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Just compare the dielectric constant of known substances to non-polar, polar, metallic designations. For example, the dielectric constant of water is around 80.0 and water is polar. H2 has a very low constant value near 2 I believe and it is very non-polar. Metals have very large epsilon values moreover. Rule of thumb, the larger the dielectric constant, the more polar the substance or material. In math terms, the potential felt between 2 charges is V= (q1 q2) / (4pi epsilon r) where q1 and q2 are different charges separated by r. The higher epsilon, the smaller V becomes. How charges interact with each other hence depends on the dielectric constant of the medium or material.

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