2
$\begingroup$

At what numerical values of ε, then what organic compounds if any mark these thresholds. How is that only for a vacuum has ε=1? This is absolute lowest limit?

$\endgroup$

closed as unclear what you're asking by Mithoron, Jon Custer, Tyberius, aventurin, pentavalentcarbon May 26 '18 at 0:21

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ This looks like two separate questions. What does the value of the vacuum have to do with ionic, polar, and non-polar compounds? Any limits on the dielectric constant aren't necessarily related to the classification of a molecule. (I'm not saying this because I know the answer.) $\endgroup$ – pentavalentcarbon May 26 '18 at 0:20
  • $\begingroup$ Related answer: chemistry.stackexchange.com/a/32862/7951 $\endgroup$ – Loong May 26 '18 at 10:50
0
$\begingroup$

Just compare the dielectric constant of known substances to non-polar, polar, metallic designations. For example, the dielectric constant of water is around 80.0 and water is polar. H2 has a very low constant value near 2 I believe and it is very non-polar. Metals have very large epsilon values moreover. Rule of thumb, the larger the dielectric constant, the more polar the substance or material. In math terms, the potential felt between 2 charges is V= (q1 q2) / (4pi epsilon r) where q1 and q2 are different charges separated by r. The higher epsilon, the smaller V becomes. How charges interact with each other hence depends on the dielectric constant of the medium or material.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.