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I have been looking for other ways to measure it, but all I've found is through aqueous solutions. So I want to know if there's another way to do it, or why it isn't possible through other means.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by A.K., Todd Minehardt, Mithoron, aventurin, DrMoishe Pippik May 20 '18 at 19:38

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Ultra pure water has very low conductivity, it is the dissolved ions that causes most of the conductivity. A high dielectric solvent is necessary to solvate ions thus any other high dielectric solvent can, in principle, also be used, eg. acetonitrile, n-methyl-formamide. $\endgroup$ – porphyrin May 20 '18 at 16:05
  • $\begingroup$ One can measure conductivity of everything that... conducts. If physical property and you seem to check too much about general chemistry instead. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron May 20 '18 at 18:38
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Did you look into ionic liquids? Also in ionic complexes like poly (ethylene oxide)? For instance, look into these references:

  1. P. V. Wright, Electrical conductivity in ionic complexes of poly(ethylene oxide), Polymer International, 1975, 7(5), 319-327 (https://doi.org/10.1002/pi.4980070505).

  2. Q.-G. Zhang, S.-S. Sun, S. Pitula, Q.-S. Liu, U. Welz-Biermann, J.-J. Zhang, Electrical conductivity of solutions of ionic liquids with methanol, ethanol, acetonitrile, and propylene carbonate, J. Chem. Eng. Data, 2011, 56(12), 4659–4664 (https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/je200616t).

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