3
$\begingroup$

I know what demethylation is.

I have no idea what mono- means, the N is nitrogen of course, I know that from the line structure image in front of me if I could not guess it - and after quite a bit of google searching I gave up and came here.

Chemistry is not my field but out of curiosity and for no practical purpose whatsoever I started learning a few things outside my field, and I came across this tiny little naming issue. I thought this is so simple I could easily find something, but apparently it is even MORE simple than I thought - meaning everybody uses the term but nobody bothers to explain it. :-(

$\endgroup$
2
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ If the starting material were colloquially named "stuff," the product would be called N-desmethyl stuff. $\endgroup$
    – Uncle Al
    Apr 3 '14 at 18:58
  • $\begingroup$ @UncleAl Thanks, but that wasn't the question. I already knew how structures are named. The question was the naming modifier of a process, the "mono" ("demethylation" was clear). Now I learned it means that ONE methyl group was removed (and not more). So, not a chemical structure naming question but a chemical process naming one. $\endgroup$
    – Mörre
    Apr 14 '14 at 14:02
7
$\begingroup$

Mono-N-demethylation means the removal of a single (mono) methyl group from a nitrogen(N)-containing functional group. For example, a reaction which transforms the alkylated amine group $\ce{-NHCH3}$ into $\ce{-NH2}$.

$\endgroup$
4
$\begingroup$

You might know the demethylation from removing a methyl group from an oxygen atom. A methoxy group $\ce{-OCH3}$ is converted to a hydroxy group $\ce{-OH}$.

This is correctly called a $\ce{O}$-demethylation.

The $\ce{N}$-demethylation is the same - for a nitrogen atom.

The mono prefix denotes that only one (of several) methyl groups is removed from a nitrogen atom.

$\endgroup$
0
2
$\begingroup$

In organic chemistry, when you speak of mono-N-demethylation, normaly you are refering to an amine bearing 2 or more methyl groups. Let's say you have N,N-dimethylaniline and you want to get N-methylaniline, then you are talking about removing ONE methyl group thus mono-N-demethylation. For organic chemists out there... Yes I know you cant do that one easily and specifically but one keeps dreaming...

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.