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Iv'e been reading about $\ce{NaCl}$ and this doubt crossed my mind. Are they anything other than just household terms?

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    $\begingroup$ in general it’s frowned upon to accept answers before 24hr is up. That way people around the world get to answer. $\endgroup$ – JSCoder says Reinstate Monica Apr 20 '18 at 12:10
  • $\begingroup$ There are fewer tables in common salt. $\endgroup$ – Stian Yttervik Apr 20 '18 at 16:58
  • $\begingroup$ Lol.What was that supposed to mean? $\endgroup$ – Nihal N.L Apr 20 '18 at 17:00
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They are both the same. If you look at this wiki page, it uses common salt and table salt as the same name. It's mainly just household terms, like people calling hydrochloric acid muriatic acid etc.

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The main difference between sea salt and table salt are in their texture, taste and processing.

Sea salt is produced through evaporation of ocean water or water from saltwater lakes. Depending on the water source, this leaves behind certain traces of minerals and elements who add flavor and color to sea salt. Table salt is mined from underground salt deposits and usually contains an additive to prevent clumping.

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  • $\begingroup$ So does iodinated salt come under table salt? $\endgroup$ – Nihal N.L Apr 20 '18 at 13:32
  • $\begingroup$ Most table salt has added iodine, an essential nutrient. $\endgroup$ – Ragini Gupta Apr 20 '18 at 15:28
  • $\begingroup$ There is no difference in taste though. Texture, certainly. $\endgroup$ – Stian Yttervik Apr 20 '18 at 16:59

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