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If I have a cup of milk and a cup of tea; to get them to a sweetness I like, I usually add less sugar to the milk as compared to the tea.

Why is it that milk needs less sugar to be just as sweet as tea?

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It's all in your taste buds. Lactose in milk is a form of sugar. It is naturally a little sweet. Tea is slightly bitter so it might seem you need to add more sugar to make it sweet.

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    $\begingroup$ Additionally, uncalibrated mouth (see iso.org/iso/home/store/catalogue_ics/… ) is very simply misguided by bitterness of the tea. It is difficult to assess the sweetness independently of other tastes. But it is possible after training. $\endgroup$ – ssavec Mar 26 '14 at 8:20
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I pretty much agree with "Mistergreen" The Lactose in milk does make it slightly sweet and the Tannic acid in tea makes it bitter and a bit chalky. When making Yogurt, the milk needs to be heated in order to kill the bacteria present in the milk. Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus are not the only bacteria that can convert lactose into lactic acid although they are the most commonly added bacterias for Yogurt making. it is the conversion of the Lactose to Lactic Acid that makes the milk in Yogurt Tart and Not Sweet Therefore before you start making yogurt, it is necessary to heat the milk so that the only bacteria it contains are the ones that are added. Unbeknownst to many, the other reason to heat the milk to 180-185 deg. F. is to change the structure of the Caseins (proteins) contained in the milk among other protein like whey. If you fail to heat the milk to an adequate temperature for at least several minutes, the Yogurt produced will be thin and can have a granular texture to it. I have made my own Yogurt for over 20 years and it is a little bit of an art form as well as a Chemistry Experiment. I normally use a Greek Yogurt for a started that contains the aforementioned Bacteria as well as well as Lactobacillus Acidophilus; Bifidobacterium Bifidus; Lactobacillus Casei. the only other ingredient in the Yogurt I use for a starter is nonfat pasteurized milk. I do use greek yogurt. The difference is that it has been strained through a fine cloth that feels like lightweight and very soft canvas. There is other cloth like cheese cloth that are not as fine a weave or you can use a very fine chinois, But I have found that the cloth I use makes a much better textured Yogurt. The Greek Yogurt Process is one step longer, but i prefer it due to the reduced Carbohydrates and it doesn't filter all of the Whey out.If I use my own Yogurt as a starter, the resulting product tends to increase as the I use it more and more and then after 6-7 uses it tends and I use fresh starter. I often use fresh starter when I want a milder tasting yogurt that will get a bit more tart as it sits in the refrigerator over a week or so. Thatit. Sorry i tend to ramble, I hope that anyone who like yogurt will try making their own. Just heat milk to 180-185 deg. F. for 3-5 min. Cool to 100 Deg. F pull out a cup or so of the milk and wix 102 Tbs. in it, mix well to get out all lumps. Then set it is in a place that is between 90 deg.F. and 110 Deg F. (I use a gas stove with the light on and a tea candle or two on a plate away from the yogurt containers. sit at Temp for 6-10 hours and cool it in fridge, then strain if you want Greek Yogurt. The more you strain the thicker it will be. Just use a hand electric mixer to blend iot to a creamy state. Namate, Brian

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