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It states mathematically $ p=Kx $ where $x$ is mole fraction of dissolved gas and $p$ is partial pressure of the gas.
Dissolution of gases is exothermic, so with increase in temperature, solubility $x$ decreases.
But increase in temperature also means an increase in partial pressure $p$ which in turn means an increase in solubility $x$. Where am I going wrong?

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  • $\begingroup$ Temperature only affects pressure if you allow it to: by keeping volume constant. If your system has a freely moving piston holding the gas for example, then temperature will lead to a volume expansion, pressure remaining constant. $\endgroup$ – Vinícius Godim Mar 24 '18 at 3:38
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Henry's law is:

At a constant temperature, the amount of a given gas dissolved in a given type and volume of liquid is directly proportional to the partial pressure of that gas in equilibrium with that liquid.

If temperature changes, the Henry's law constant itself changes.

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