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Something that is not reactive to lesser wavelengths of light, specifically IR.

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you want a material that does not react with IR radiation (most materials do not react with IR)? Or do you want something that is transparent to IR? $\endgroup$ – Ben Norris Mar 12 '14 at 11:03
  • $\begingroup$ "Lesser wavelength" or IR: You can only have one. Do you really want a photoactive polymer or a photoinitiated polymerizaton? $\endgroup$ – Klaus-Dieter Warzecha Mar 12 '14 at 11:05
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Methacrylates make nice starting materials for the lightinduced polymerization.

In methyl methacrylate (MMA), camphorquinone (a typical initiator) has an absorption maximum around $\lambda$ = 473 nm.

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You mean "monomer" or "oligomer" not "polymer." You are making the polymer by polymerization or crosslinking. UV-curing optical adhesives. You choose nice (mix of) free radical-cure monomers, then dissolve a photoinitiator like camphorquinone, a diarylketone, a benzoin ether, or a benzil ketal. The molecule fragments to free radicals after absorbing a UV photon. That sets off the polymerization. Exclude oxygen (triplet diradical quench). Cage recombination of the intiator is your enemy.

A microwave-pumped electrodeless mercury bulb the size of your finger can output a kilowatt of UV. Beware of pinholes in your irradiation chamber, including entry and exit if continuous. And now, a second of silence for the Trommsdorff effect.

If you want a polymer as such to do be photoactive, then something like Prog. Polym. Sci. 28 729 (2003). Pull it up in a university library to get the graphics.

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