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I know that $\ce{H2O}$ is neutral. So how does adding one more hydrogen atom to it make it positive ion ($\ce{H3O+}$)?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by pentavalentcarbon, Mithoron, TAR86, airhuff, Todd Minehardt Feb 25 '18 at 3:46

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Hi Hark, welcome to Chem.SE! Where did you read that addition of an hydrogen atom forms a hydronium ion? In fact, it doesn't. Hydronium ions are formed by addition of a proton to a water molecule. $\endgroup$ – Gaurang Tandon Feb 24 '18 at 11:51
  • $\begingroup$ So all ions are formed this way? $\endgroup$ – Hark Feb 24 '18 at 11:53
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    $\begingroup$ Ions are always charged. You cannot hope to form them by combining one atom with another atom. $\endgroup$ – Gaurang Tandon Feb 24 '18 at 11:54
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    $\begingroup$ Deprotonation of sulphuric acid. Twice. $\endgroup$ – Gaurang Tandon Feb 24 '18 at 11:58
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    $\begingroup$ A "neutral ion" does not exist. Neutral gases of a similar formula - SO3 and SO2 - do exist, though they are not ions. $\endgroup$ – Gaurang Tandon Feb 24 '18 at 12:01
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The flaw in the question is exactly what Gaurang Tandon said: $\ce{H3O^+}$ is formed by a water molecule and a proton ($\ce{H^+}$), not a hydrogen atom.

Compare the number of electrons in both sides of the following two equations:

$$\ce{H2O + H^+ -> H3O^+}$$

$$\ce{H2O + H^. -> H3O^+}$$

The last equation is wrong: there's an extra electron in the left hand side.

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