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I know that Lewis' concept of acid base deals in terms of electrons and Brønsted in terms of $\ce{H+}$ and base which can provide electrons or $\ce{OH-}$. If I am wrong (partially or fully) please explain Lewis and Brønsted-Lowry concept along.

According to me it is a Lewis base because of the lone pair on oxygen of the alcohol and a Brønsted acid.

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    $\begingroup$ Obviously you have some ideas about Lewis and Bronsted theory. So, what do you think an alcohol is? Is it one or the other or is can it be both at the same time? Please include your own thoughts on the matter into the question, so that we can help you to clear any misunderstandings. $\endgroup$ – Philipp Mar 10 '14 at 15:42
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Alcohols can act as both. Many reactions of alcohols are believed to start with their protonations or deprotonation. However, isolating salts where they act as bases is much harder, while alcoholates are quite easy both to make and isolate. Protonated alcohols are very active alkylating agents and if fitting $\beta$-hydrogen is present, are prone to beta-elimination.

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Alcohols overall are weak Brønsted acids, (water and ethanol pKa 15.7 and 16). They are middling Lewis (hard) bases (HCl gas ionization in anhydrous ethanol solution).

Relevant page

Consider Al(O-tert-Bu)${_3}$ and AlMe${_3}$ as simultaneous Brønsted bases and Lewis acids. Cf: hard and soft acids and bases, solvo-cations and solvo-anions, and even as a redox reaction. It works solid state as intercalation, J. Chem. Ed. 81(6) 819 (2004).

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Alcohols are weak acids and donate protons to the strong bases forming alkoxide. Alkoxide ion is a strong conjugate base which shows that alcohols are weak acid but alcohols are strong lewis bases and donate electrons to hydrogen in reaction with HX.

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Alcohols is a brønsted base because of the presence of unpaired electron over Oxygen atom which make them proton acceptor.

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