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(No, I am not talking about why Ionic Reactions are faster than Covalent reaction.)

This question has me stumped. I mean, at first it looks obvious; water is polar in nature, but what exactly does that help with? Also, can ionic reactions even happen in non-aqueous mediums?

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  • $\begingroup$ What do ionic and covalent reactions mean? $\endgroup$ – orthocresol Feb 11 '18 at 10:09
  • $\begingroup$ @orthocresol I think the asker means the difference between reactions involving only neutral species and reactions involving oppositely charged species. $\endgroup$ – Nicolau Saker Neto Feb 11 '18 at 10:41
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Water has a permanent dipole character, which means it has a slight positive and negative charge permanently in it (due to electronegativity difference). So, in case of an ionic reaction, it helps in easier solvation of ions by pulling them with its charged centres (+ve centre attracts -ve ions and -ve centre attracts +ve ions)

Aqueous is a term specially for water as a solvent. Any polar solvent can support ionic reactions.

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