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İ heard that : Charge of a mole of electrons/charge of single electron =avagadros constant How is this derived ?

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  • $\begingroup$ What is a mole, come to think of it? $\endgroup$ Jan 21 '18 at 20:34
  • $\begingroup$ Charge of a mole of electrons is the Faraday electrolysis constant. So the Avogadro constant can be measured in an electrolysis experiment. $\endgroup$
    – Zhuoran He
    Jan 22 '18 at 0:01
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The key is to determine the charge of a mole of electrons vs the charge of one electron.

We get the charge of one electron from the Milliken oil drop experiment.

For a mole of electrons you can start uf you firzt get the molar mass of water, call this $18.016$ grams per mole. Now electrolyze water with an inert electrolyte such as sodium sulfate. Work out the charge transfer required to decompose one mole = $18.016$ grams. This is two moles of electrons based on the stoichiometry of the electrochemical reaction. Half of this divided by the single electron charge is Avogadro's number.

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I believe it is the number of carbon atoms in 12 grams.

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  • $\begingroup$ How do you count the atoms? $\endgroup$ Jan 21 '18 at 21:50
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    $\begingroup$ OP meant his specific calculation with electrons. $\endgroup$
    – Mithoron
    Jan 21 '18 at 21:57

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