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With two closed vessels of equal volume that are connected to each other through a narrow tube, the temperature of one of the containers is increased.

Why does the final volume of gas inside each container remain the same as earlier?

This is a solved example that I was trying to understand where they have taken the final volume of gas in each container to be the same as before. (Refer to equations 2 and 3) (https://i.stack.imgur.com/Q7UD8.jpg)

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    $\begingroup$ The volume stays the same, because the containers stay the same. If the volume of one container would increase, that would mean it would expand. (BTW Note that variables like $T$ are printed in italics and units like K are printed with an upright font.) $\endgroup$ – mhchem Dec 19 '17 at 13:15
  • $\begingroup$ @mhchem but isn’t it possible that the volume increases or decreases corresponding to an increase or decrease in pressure ? $\endgroup$ – Aditi Dec 19 '17 at 13:30
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    $\begingroup$ No, that's the point. If in a stable container, the gas cannot take more volume. It cannot take less, because a gas always fills the whole container. Temperature can change, pressure can change (for instance by forcing more gas in the container), but volume cannot change (if the container does not change, expand, explode). $\endgroup$ – mhchem Dec 19 '17 at 13:37
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The volume stays the same, because the containers stay the same. If the volume of one container would increase, that would mean it would expand.

If in a stable container, the gas cannot take more volume. It cannot take less, because a gas always fills the whole container. Temperature can change, pressure can change (for instance by forcing more gas in the container), but volume cannot change (if the container does not change, expand, shrink, explode).

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