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Is radiation time the same thing as half life period?

Also, if I'm talking about excited species in a gas, how would the gas interaction affect the radiation time, are there some formulas/approaches?

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    $\begingroup$ Can you please clarify what you mean by 'radiation time'? $\endgroup$ – Richard Terrett Jul 30 '12 at 10:14
  • $\begingroup$ Radiation time might have to do something with Mean Half time of the radioactive decay? $\endgroup$ – BigSack Sep 9 '12 at 11:55
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In the context of photochemistry, radiation time or half life period are not used, as far as I know.

The only relevant technical term i'm aware of -in that context- is half-life (time), which describes the time needed for the concentration of an excited species to decrease to 50% of the initial value, cf. S. E. Braslavsky, Glossary of terms used in photochemistry, Pure Appl. Chem., 2007, 79, 293-465 [DOI].

For longer-lived excited triplet states in the gas phase, radiationless deactivation upon collision with a ground-state molecules will play a role.

Thus, the lifetime might be correlated with the mean free path of the molecules.

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    $\begingroup$ You missed the lifetime of a radioactive species, which works on the natural logarithm (e) instead of base 2. It is normally represented by tau. $\endgroup$ – Canageek Jul 31 '12 at 14:37
  • $\begingroup$ @Canageek You're absolutely right! I only thought in electronically excited species. I guess i'm still a bit biased ;) $\endgroup$ – Klaus-Dieter Warzecha Jul 31 '12 at 14:55
  • $\begingroup$ I worked in a radiochem lab last summer, so I had to work with both systems when looking things up. $\endgroup$ – Canageek Jul 31 '12 at 18:52
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In the context of radioactivity (which might be what you meant by “radiation”), the half-life of a radionuclide is a well-defined term and commonly used. “Radiation time”, on the other hand, is not used to describe radionuclides.

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