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(1E)-1-ethylidene-2-(propan-2-ylidene)cyclobutane

I think it should be yes, but my book says no. I think the two geometrical isomers are

Z-isomer

(1Z)-1-ethylidene-2-(propan-2-ylidene)cyclobutane

E-isomer

(1E)-1-ethylidene-2-(propan-2-ylidene)cyclobutane

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    $\begingroup$ Which book? Please state the source properly. $\endgroup$ – epsilon-emperor Dec 16 '17 at 10:10
  • $\begingroup$ The book is wrong unless one of the two does not exist. For the (hypothetical? ) structures you are right. $\endgroup$ – Alchimista Dec 16 '17 at 13:19
  • $\begingroup$ Well, there would be sever sterical clash for Z, so it's practically non-existant. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Dec 16 '17 at 16:45
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The two isomers are distinct substances, differing only in the orientation of a double bond, so they must be geometrical isomers. However, as a practical matter, they may interconvert under mild conditions and/or one may be much less stable than the other.

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