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Let's say that I supercool a bottle of beer and then tap it so it freezes and solidifies. If I were to allow the frozen beer to melt completely, and then freeze the same bottle again, would it still be able to supercool and not solidify?

I am guessing that it will solidify while freezing because it is no longer pressurized. But I don't know and don;t completely understand this concept.

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  • $\begingroup$ You never said you opened your bottle, which implies that it must still be pressurized. Then again, it's hardly related to supercooling. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Dec 11 '17 at 5:48
  • $\begingroup$ Actually you can supercool water as well. And actually the cleanest is tge system easier is the supercool it. So in principle you can repeat the cycle. $\endgroup$ – Alchimista Dec 11 '17 at 13:18
  • $\begingroup$ One can supercool very pure water, I'm afraid suppercooling beer would be at least very difficult, if not impossible. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Dec 11 '17 at 17:07
  • $\begingroup$ @Mithoron many an collegiate "amateur scientist" has done this exact thing when they were in a rush on a weekend night and got distracted, myself included (on multiple occasions). Take the bottle out, bump the bottom, and watch the crystals travel up the bottle. It may be harder with unfiltered beer, though, and even more so for bottle-conditioned beer. My point here is unless this is a case where there is an general definition used by the public and stricter definition used by experts, I think your comment is incorrect. $\endgroup$ – SendersReagent Jun 29 '18 at 22:06
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If, as noted in the comments, you do not open the bottle, the process should basically be repeatable, as longer as the container does not crack. Additionally, the freezing may destroy certain larger things that do not tolerate ice crystals, such as yeast cells, if any are present.

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