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Could you heat a can of water to 212 degrees Fahrenheit but stay below the aluminum or the can’s metal’s melting point. Either through putting the can in boiling water or heating it up. Would it be possible to have an unopened can of water vapor/gas state water? Or would the evaporated water condense and precipitate back into the water before I could observe it? In addition, would the pressurized can have an affect? Lastly, If I add more heat (energy) and speed up the movement of the water particles, will I be able to preserve the gaseous state longer so I could experience it?

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  • $\begingroup$ You seem to imply that water will evaporate in a closed can. It won't. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Nov 29 '17 at 11:44
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There are good reasons any chemist advises and is advised against heating closed systems. Do not do that. Nevertheless, let's go through this item by item.

Could you heat a can of water to 212 degrees Fahrenheit but stay below the aluminum or the can’s metal’s melting point Either through putting the can in boiling water or heating it up. Would it be possible to have an unopened can of water vapor/gas state water?

Yes. At ambient pressure, water will boil at temperatures lower than the melting point of most metal cans. If there is a gas phase in the can (e.g. it is not entirely filled with liquid water), some would leave the liquid phase and enter the gas phase upon heating. The result would be a can that would contain an appreciable amount of water vapor. Note that heating a closed can be dangerous because it may turn itself into an open can, spewing hot vapor.

In addition, even in a completely filled can you may be able to obtain supercritical water - but pressurized $\ce{CO2}$ is a better choice for that experiment.

Or would the evaporated water condense and precipitate back into the water before I could observe it?

That depends. At some point, the can will cool down and most of the water vapor will condense to a liquid again. Now the observation: see safety caution above.

In addition, would the pressurized can have an affect?

If you mean: will this have an effect on the can? Yes, it might deform. See safety caution above.

Lastly, If I add more heat (energy) and speed up the movement of the water particles, will I be able to preserve the gaseous state longer so I could experience it?

Not sure how you would want to experience it, but of course, the hotter the can, the longer it will take for it to cool down.

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