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My (very unreliable) school textbook tells me:

Lower alcohols form a solid derivative with certain metal salts.

and,

It is for this reason that ethanol cannot be dried/concentrated using anhydrous calcium chloride.


Nowhere else in the book, is there any reference to this supposed reaction between a lower alcohol (ethanol) and a metal salt (calcium chloride). So I couldn't read more about this from there...

Googling wasn't much help; though I did find this paper that seems to concur with my textbook (albeit, with more detail) ... the paper is dated all the way back to 1923, so I suspect the modern Chemist's view of the matter would be different (the paper makes use of the term "alcoholate", which no longer carries the same meaning).


Question:

Does ethanol really react with calcium chloride to form some "solid derivative"?

Additionally,

Do lower alcohols (methanol and ethanol to name a few) really react with "metal salts" (textbook didn't specify, so i would use the following examples: copper sulfate and magnesium chloride)?

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