2
$\begingroup$

I see people writing "Glucuronyl C5-epimerase", "Glucuronyl C-5-epimerase", "Glucuronyl-C-5-epimerase" and "Glucuronyl C5 epimerase", which one is correct? Is there a naming convention?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ @basseur The question is very clear and concise. It is: ‘should enzyme names like the one above contain hyphens and should there be a hypen between C and 5?’ I think this is answerable and sufficiently on-topic (while it may be even more on topic on Biology). $\endgroup$ – Jan Oct 13 '17 at 9:33
  • $\begingroup$ @Jan: You are right. I guess from my standpoint as a professional chemist I was too narrow-minded to see, that this is not as obvious as it seems to me. My bad. I actually don't believe, this is a homework question, as it was flagged. $\endgroup$ – basseur Oct 13 '17 at 10:11
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Welcome to chemistry.se! I don't think this is homework, and I am reopening the question. Nevertheless, please see our guidelines on how to ask nomenclature questions. $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Oct 13 '17 at 11:14
5
$\begingroup$

I have not found this particular enzyme in Enzyme Nomenclature. However, following the Recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the name should be glucuronyl 5-epimerase. See also this sublist for some analogous names of other epimerases.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

In addition to Loong’s answer which includes the formally correct way to write it: if you wish to unambiguously indicate that a carbon atom is epimerised,[1] the only possible choices are those that leave no space between the symbol for carbon and the digit. Atoms are number-named by writing the element symbol directly followed by their number without hyphen or space. So the atom in question is C5, meaning we have a C5-epimerase.


Note:

[1]: Which is superfluous since carbon atoms are practically the only atoms ever epimerised.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.