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A classmate asks you to draw the structure of 2,4-diethyl-4-ethoxyhexane, which he cannot find in a chemical reference manual. Draw the structure of 2,4-diethyl-4-ethoxyhexane.


line structure of 2,4-diethyl-4-ethoxyhexane


(Question continued...) The reason your classmate cannot find the compound in a chemical reference manual is that 2,4-diethyl-4-ethoxyhexane is the incorrect name for the compound. What is the correct name?


Here are my steps:

  1. I count the longest carbon chain = 7 carbons = -heptane
  2. I look at all the substituents: 1 ethoxy group, 1 ethyl group and 1 methyl group
  3. I number the carbon chain starting from the end closer to the ethoxy group (alphabetical order)
  4. I add all the substituents and the carbon chain together

enter image description here

In this case, this is the name I come up with: 3-ethoxy-3-ethyl-5-methylheptane, which is incorrect. Can somebody tell me where I went wrong, please?

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  • $\begingroup$ Your answer is correct, it looks like the answer source you are looking at is wrong. I found this on Chegg and this from a google search. $\endgroup$ – Tyberius Sep 25 '17 at 17:51
  • $\begingroup$ @Tyberius That would make sense to me, as I really do not understand what I might have done wrong. I guess, my school chemistry software is wrong for once... Thanks! $\endgroup$ – Frieda Jewel Sep 25 '17 at 18:01
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    $\begingroup$ @FriedaJewel I would always be on the lookout for that with online chemistry homework. Every once in awhile you will run into questions that have the wrong answer or require the correct answer in some strange format. $\endgroup$ – Tyberius Sep 25 '17 at 18:03
  • $\begingroup$ (This one was easy, but) If you absolutely can't find a solution, you can always search for the sum formula (might be tedious) or use scifinder et al. who let you search for a structure sketch. Also some of the common computer programs to draw chemical structures can generate names, often correctly. $\endgroup$ – Karl Sep 26 '17 at 4:22
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In short, your answer is correct. The steps that you have taken are correct, so it's likely the online homework tool has a key mistake.

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  • $\begingroup$ This CW answer exists for the OP to accept it, and mark this question as resolved. $\endgroup$ – Pritt says Reinstate Monica Sep 26 '17 at 4:56

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