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The following table gives the Ionic Molar Conductivities of a few electrolytes in water. What are the reasons for the unusually high values for both H$^+$ and OH$^-$ even though both undergo solvation in water? Why do they retain their mobility in water even after solvation?

\begin{array}{lr} \text{Electrolyte} & \text{Ionic Molar Conductivity (mS m$^2$ mol$^{-1})$} \\ \hline \text{H$^+$} & 34.96 \\ \text{Li$^+$} & 3.87\\ \text{Mg$^{+2}$} & 10.60 \\ \text{[N(CH$_3$)$_4$]$^+$} & 4.49 \\ \end{array}

\begin{array}{lr} \text{Electrolyte}&\text{ Ionic Molar Conductivity (mS m$^2$ mol$^{-1})$} \\ \hline \text{OH$^-$} & 19.91\\ \text{F$^-$} & 5.54\\ \text{CO$_3$$^{2-}$} & 13.86\\ \text{HCO$_2$$^-$} & 5.46\\ \end{array}

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    $\begingroup$ Your question looks better then old one, but there are answers already. $\endgroup$
    – Mithoron
    Sep 22 '17 at 16:36