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I'm translating a Russian text in which there is the following diagram of tryptophan degradation:

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Further on in the text, hydroxytryptophan is called "the mono-oxidized form" (моноокисленная форма) and dihydroxytryptophan is called "the dioxidized form" (диокисленная форма). Is this correct and would this be understood by the readers if I translate it as-is?

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First, you can use Google Ngram viewer to check out how often and in which context proposed words and their combination is used/has been used in the literature.

Second, I feel that "mono-oxidized" is overly redundant and just "oxidized" will deliver. Even in Russian you would rarely say so ("моноокисленный" or "единожды окисленный" is usually seen as an unnecessary complication in most cases). For "dioxidized" there are plenty examples when it is used in a similar context both in inorganic and bio chemistry, so it should a safe usage from what I see.

There is also an another option to say "two-stage oxidation" ("окисленный по двум ступеням") instead of "dioxidized" if you want to underline that the process has been carried out step by step.

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    $\begingroup$ Thank you! I googled for "monooxidized tryptophan". I'm not sure how Ngram could help me in this case. I was not sure whether the addition of the -OH group could be called "mono/di/oxidation", because I last self-studied chemistry in April.. zero free time. $\endgroup$ – CowperKettle Sep 5 '17 at 2:26
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    $\begingroup$ I googled that too and the first link was this paper where "mono-oxidized (+16) and dioxidized (+32) form of tryptophan" expression has been used. So again, I see both mono-oxidized and dioxidized valid, though subjectively the mono prefix is not necessary. $\endgroup$ – andselisk Sep 5 '17 at 2:31

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