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Ex- how can we understand that ClF is a gas @ 298K? Is there some logic behind it? Please explain.

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If you know that chlorine is a gas then you can infer that ClF is also a gas. The most important intermolecular force in interhalogens is dispersion. Chlorine has stronger dispersion forces than ClF. The dipole-dipole forces can be neglected in almost all cases.

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