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I was reading a text and it asked "aromatic compounds have pi-electron clouds above and below the plane due to?". Someone, please help.

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closed as off-topic by Jannis Andreska, airhuff, Pritt Balagopal, Mithoron, Todd Minehardt Aug 14 '17 at 12:50

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  • $\begingroup$ Hmm, do you know what aromatic compounds are in the first place? If not, check the wikipedia article for Aromaticity. $\endgroup$ – Pritt Balagopal Aug 14 '17 at 4:40
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That is just how Aromaticity is defined. Simply put, it means you have delocalized $\pi$ electrons in some circular structure. Being above and below the molecular plane is simply a property of $\pi$ orbitals/electrons.

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The orbitals are akin to normal modes of vibration. Sigma bonds have no nodes, like the fundamental vibration of a guitar string. Pi bonds have one node (in the same plane as the atomic nuclei), and that is like the first harmonic of a guitar string (pluck it while holding your finger gently against the midpoint of the string). The note is one octave higher than the fundamental--higher frequency means higher energy.

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