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The above example is benzene.

Only six electrons contribute to the 6 π bonds and pπ orbitals. Normally, an orbital requires two electrons to satisfactorily "fill" it. I don't understand how this rule is not abided yet bezene is still considered a stable molecule.

Am I to understand that a single electron can be shared by 6 orbitals simultaneously? Do all 6 π orbitals completely spread out amongst each other to each this?

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marked as duplicate by Mithoron, Community Jul 25 '17 at 0:32

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  • $\begingroup$ Well, it seems you still don't get resonance and try to get to MO theory... 6 electrons are still in three orbitals which are spread out on molecule. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Jul 24 '17 at 23:45
  • $\begingroup$ @Mithoron Are you saying that each pair of π orbitals form a single orbital? Do you have any good resources to understand resonance? $\endgroup$ – MacroGuy Jul 24 '17 at 23:47
  • $\begingroup$ That's for MO ^ and about resonance - chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/31352/… $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Jul 24 '17 at 23:51